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Johnny gets his hammer

Posted by Rona Fischman January 15, 2009 03:00 PM

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Remember John Dough? You met him on November 6. He bought a bank-owned property with the intention of finishing the renovation and selling it for profit. You heard about his private financing on November 18th. Now, John has a loan, he has a deed, he has a budget. He's picking up his hammer and getting to work.Hereís John in his own words:

Getting to Closing in One Piece: Itís been awhile since I last commented on our progress so here is an update. After we secured our financing we had about three weeks until closing. It was pretty uneventful. Title was clear, taxes were owed, and the water/sewer bill had to be paid. The bank owning the unit agreed to pay the taxes, but would only pay a 1/3 of the water/sewer. So we had to pay the balance, which wasnít much ($400 or so) and we also had to insure the property which meant that weíd be paying for the share of the other condos in the building that were bank owned. That cost was about $1200 for a half year master insurance policy. We plan to recoup 2/3 of that cost when the banks try to sell their units. With all that going on, we closed about a week later than expected but we werenít subject to the usual fees that banks invoke when you donít close on time. We now owned the condo.

Renovation begins: As I mentioned in my earlier entries, the unit was already half renovated. So it had been gutted, re-wired, and re-plumbed. When we took over the unit had the sheetrock and plaster done, new doors installed, the HVAC system was installed, and 90% of the trim was done. Our budget was $49,250 to complete the unit. That doesnít include any work in the common halls and exterior, which also needed some work. Our budget is listed below:
Carpentry $4000
Bathrooms $8000
Finish hvac $1500
Finish elec. $3750
Finish plumb. $3500
Wood floors $9000
Cabinets $6000
Counters $4000
Painting $3500
Knobs/pulls $1000
Appliances $5000

As we have been trying to order supplies and keep our timeline on track, we have noticed that with the credit crunch manufacturers arenít making their products in great enough numbers so we have had delays getting flooring, vanityís, door knobs, and lighting fixtures. We are probably 2-3 weeks behind schedule as a result of it. Next entry Iíll talk about how we did with our budget and our inability (thus far) to get refinanced. On a side note we have had a couple of showings with strong interest. Prospective buyers have been impressed with the quality of the finishes and the attention to detail. There isnít much on the market thatís competing directly with us that can match our level of quality.

What do you think of Johnís plan?
Are other builders seeing delays in getting construction materials? Is this a new side-effect of the economic downturn?

This blog is not written or edited by Boston.com or the Boston Globe.
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About boston real estate now
Scott Van Voorhis is a freelance writer who specializes in real estate and business issues.

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