Boston College’s Pat Mullane envisioned a nightmare scenario a few weeks ago. Johnny Gaudreau had stuck with his commitment to Northeastern and was on a line with Kevin Roy.

Frightening, at least for an opposing player.

“I would hate to play against him and Kevin Roy,” Mullane said at the time. “That would be terrible for us. I’d have a lot of minuses against those guys, that’s for sure.”

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Roy and Gaudreau are two of the best offensive forces in college hockey, something Roy proved again on Monday, nabbing the Beanpot MVP trophy despite being on the losing side as Northeastern fell to BC, 6-3, in the championship game at TD Garden.

He is just the fifth MVP from a losing team in Beanpot history, and the first since Boston University’s Sean Fields in 2004. He is also the fifth MVP for Northeastern, and the first since the Huskies won the tournament in 1988.

Roy also made it two freshman MVPs in a row – Gaudreau won it last season.

“[Roy’s] similar to Johnny Gaudreau on Boston College,” Northeastern coach Jim Madigan said. “He’s a great player. And great players make great plays at the right time. Obviously Johnny Gaudreau did tonight also.”

Still, it would have been hard to choose anyone else after Roy scored five goals in the tournament. He followed up his hat trick in the first round with two more goals on Monday. (He was matched by two goals from Gaudreau on Monday.)

Until Braden Pimm scored in the third period, all five of the Huskies goals were by Roy. And he came close to more, with a breakaway chance with about two minutes to go in the second period as he tried for his second consecutive hat trick.

It was after that save by Parker Milner that BC stole a goal of its own, turning a chance at a tie score to a 3-1 BC lead.

“I had a lot of time, and I don’t know. He ended up making a big save for his team,” Roy said. “If I score it’s 2-2. It was definitely a turning point of that game.”

It was one of the few misses for Roy in a tournament that demonstrated just how good he can be in the biggest moments.

Even after Northeastern had gone down, 4-1, the fourth goal scored with a single second left in the second period, it was Roy who helped bring the Huskies back into a game that could have been lost in that moment. He netted his second goal just 11 seconds into the third period.

“Bang. Bang, right off early in the third period. He knew we needed a jump and a lift, and he created that for us,” Madigan said. “Now that’s momentum and we got the third one right away. That’s him. That’s the type of player he is.”

But unfortunately for Northeastern, Roy couldn’t do everything. He couldn’t do enough to keep Gaudreau and his teammates from winning BC’s fourth consecutive Beanpot. He couldn’t get the victory, though he did win the MVP. And he did enough to give Mullane bad dreams, even with Gaudreau safely ensconced in the BC lineup.

“You saw what he brings to our team,” Madigan said. “He’s a highly offensive, intelligent skill player. Around the net he’s very dangerous. He creates his shot as well as anyone.

“So when he’s got the puck on his stick, good things are going to happen. And that’s what happened.”