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Bonds trainer seen with syringe

Childhood friend testifies at trial

Associated Press / March 24, 2011

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A key government witness in the Barry Bonds perjury trial in San Francisco testified yesterday that he saw the home run king’s personal trainer leave Bonds’s bedroom at spring training with a syringe in 2000.

Steve Hoskins said that when he saw Bonds and his personal trainer, Greg Anderson, coming out of the master bedroom he assumed Anderson had injected the star player with steroids. He testified that he saw the two disappear into that room “once or twice’’ at each spring training over three consecutive years beginning in 2000.

He also told the jury of eight women and four men that, a year earlier, Bonds had ordered him to research the benefits and side effects of a steroid after the slugger had undergone elbow surgery.

Hoskins was a childhood friend of Bonds’s and traveled with him as an assistant until 2003. Hoskins testified that Bonds’s significant weight gain concerned him so much that he secretly recorded a conversation with Anderson about steroids so he could convince Bonds’s father, Bobby Bonds, that his son was using the drugs.

At one point on the recording, Anderson is heard discussing what prosecutors allege are designer steroids he supplied to Bonds. Says Anderson: “But the whole thing is . . . everything that I’ve been doing at this point, it’s all undetectable.’’

Hoskins also said he secretly recorded conversations with Bonds’s doctor and business lawyer. Hoskins said his recording of Dr. Arthur Ting was made in late 2003 or 2004, in hopes of dissuading Bonds from using steroids.

“I was trying to tell Barry how bad the steroids and drugs actually were,’’ Hoskins said. “I was trying to convey to him from Dr. Ting and others how bad they were.’’

Under questioning from federal prosecutor Matt Parrella, a jittery Hoskins testified that in 1999 Bonds ordered him to look at the pros and cons of the steroid Winstrol.

“He said, ‘Find out what this steroid does and what the side effects are and is it good or bad,’ ’’ Hoskins said. Bonds told him to consult Ting, Bonds’s personal surgeon who is also scheduled to testify for the government.

Oswalt struck by liner Phillies pitcher Roy Oswalt was hit behind the right ear by Manny Ramirez’s line drive during an exhibition loss yesterday to the Rays. X-rays were negative and the Phillies said Oswalt may be able to make his next scheduled start.

Oswalt had a neck bruise. The Phillies said he did not lose consciousness and was not dizzy before leaving in the fourth inning.

Oswalt fell to the ground and remained there until a trainer and manager Charlie Manuel reached the mound to check on him. The righthander was down less than a minute before standing up and walking to the visiting clubhouse on his own.

“I knew it hit him on the side of the head, but Manny didn’t really hit the ball hard,’’ Manuel said. “He hit the ball OK, but he didn’t really crush it. It didn’t cut him or nothing.’’

Granderson has doubt Yankees center fielder Curtis Granderson might not be ready for Opening Day because of a strained muscle on his right side. Granderson underwent an MRI yesterday, which showed a strained internal oblique. Granderson has “slight’’ doubt about being ready for the opener March 31 against Detroit, but added that he would not surprised if the team opted not to have him play . . . The Nationals have put pitcher Stephen Strasburg on the 60-day disabled list as he recovers from elbow surgery last September. Doctors have said his recovery time from Tommy John surgery is 12 to 18 months . . . Blue Jays righthander Brandon Morrow will start the regular season on the disabled list because of right forearm inflammation. Morrow was slated to be Toronto’s No. 2 starter . . . Rangers righthander Brandon Webb was scratched from a bullpen session because he was unable to get loose. Webb, who was scheduled to throw 60-70 pitches, said he didn’t feel any pain in his surgically repaired shoulder but could feel discomfort at the top of the joint. Webb has not pitched in the majors since Opening Day 2009 . . . Mariners second baseman Adam Kennedy has been charged with a misdemeanor count of driving under the influence and a misdemeanor count of driving with a blood alcohol level above the legal limit following his Jan. 26 arrest in Newport Beach, Calif. . . . Braves minor league manager Luis Salazar returned to camp, two weeks after being struck in the face by a foul ball and losing his left eye.

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