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Final: Red Sox 11, Rockies 4

Posted by Julian Benbow, Globe Staff  June 25, 2013 06:56 PM

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End of the seventh, Red Sox 10, Rockies 4:There aren't too many more ways to describe what Jose Iglesias is doing these days. He's 3 for 4 with a double, two RBIs and two runs scored.

His Wall single started what would turn into a two-run inning for the Sox. After Jacoby Ellsbury followed up with an infield single, and Shane Victorino moved them over with a comebacker, Dustin Pedroia drove Iglesias in with a fly ball to center. With first base open, David Ortiz took an intentional walked (a move that led to boos from the Fenway crowd). Mike Napoli took advantage of a two-out situation, coming up with a single to score Ellsbury.

End of the fifth, Red Sox 8, Rockies 2: For the first time all night, the Rockies manage to hang a zero. Adam Ottavino got fly balls out of Shane Victorino, Dustin Pedroia and (after walking David Ortiz) finally Mike Napoli to make it a clean inning.

End of the fourth, Red Sox 8, Rockies 2: Stephen Drew thought he had his sixth homer of the season. The umpiring crew thought differently, and after reviewing the shot to center, called it a triple.

Ultimately, he'd come around to score a batter later on Jose Iglesias's double. As if you need any more numbers to tell you how well Jose Iglesias has been, this is his 17th multi-hit game of the season, tops among American League rookies.

End of the third, Red Sox 7, Rockies 1: After watching Juan Nicasio give up 12 hits and seven runs in 2.1 innings, Walt Weiss finally decided to pull his pitcher out of the fight.

Shane Victorino tagged him for an RBI single. Dustin Pedroia's run-scoring base hit gave him three hits and three RBIs in three innings.

It's the 15th time in his career that Pedroia's put up three hits and three RBIs in the same game, and the first time since last August.

Middle of the third, Red Sox 5, Rockies 1: How absurd was the jumping-jack catch that Dustin Pedroia made to rob DJ LeMahieu of what looked like a line-drive single to right? Pedroia had use his glove to hide his grin.

End of the second, Red Sox 5, Rockies 1: Considering he had Shane Victorino down 1-and-2 and was a strike away from ending the inning, things went about as poorly as possible for Nicasio.

Victorino ripped a double to to left, which would be the first of three straight two-out doubles and five straight two-out hits for the Red Sox in a three-run inning.

Dustin Pedroia and David Ortiz both drove in runs with their two-out doubles, and Mike Napoli plated Ortiz with a bloop single that found a home in right.

With a .252 team average, the Red Sox by no means the best two-out hitting team in the American league (they're actually seventh) and Nicasio isn't necessarily a bad pitcher with two outs (.224 average against and 20 strikeouts), but the Sox made him look like one.

Middle of the second, Red Sox 2, Rockies 1: You've probably heard this one before. Ryan Dempster gave up a solo homer.

This time Wilin Rosario smacked his 3-and-1 slider over the Wall to get the Rockies on the board.

Dempster's given up 17 homers this season. Only two of them have come with men on base. Also, those 17 homers? All by 17 different batters.

End of the first, Red Sox 2, Rockies 0:The Sox first run was more or less right off the assembly line. Dustin Pedroia stroked a double to left, Shane Victorino moved him over with a sacrifice bunt and Dustin Pedroia drove him in with a single through the right side of the infield.

They seemed like they were in line for a pretty big inning when Rockies starter Juan Nicasio dug himself into a nice little hole with a four-pitch walk to David Ortiz, and a five-pitch walk to Mike Napoli that loaded the bases.

But Daniel Nava's RBI single was all they could get out of it. Nicasio's given up 19 runs in his past six starts and hasn't won since come away with a win in more than a month.

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Pregame: It wont look like anything special, but when Dustin Pedroia takes the field today, it will be his 78th start, a major-league high.

Its as easy to overlook as the fact that hes reached base safely in 69 of those games while hitting .355 at Fenway and maintaining an American League-leading .997 fielding percentage.

Hes been a rock this season, and in all likelihood, hell play a pretty large factor in this two-game set with the Rockies.

In 106 games against the National league, Pedroia is hitting .317 hitter. That clip is the eight-highest all-time interleague average and the third-highest among active players behind Nick Markakis (.348) and Howie Kendrick (.324).

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