Red Sox
Vaughn, shown here speaking to a high school statistics class, said his work isn't about feeling guilty for only playing two injury-plagued, subpar seasons in New York before retiring in January 2004. ''I got paid for what I had done,'' said Vaughn, who was making $15 million a year. ''In baseball that's how they do things. I didn't owe anybody anything. ... I end up in New York and create a business that my idol was involved with. There's nothing here to be sorry about.''
Mo Vaughn, a giant in the community
Vaughn, shown here speaking to a high school statistics class, said his work isn't about feeling guilty for only playing two injury-plagued, subpar seasons in New York before retiring in January 2004. ''I got paid for what I had done,'' said Vaughn, who was making $15 million a year. ''In baseball that's how they do things. I didn't owe anybody anything. ... I end up in New York and create a business that my idol was involved with. There's nothing here to be sorry about.''
(Globe Staff Photo / Stan Grossfeld)