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Reaction low key to "Los Suns"

Reverend Al Sharpton, left, and Maricopa County Supervisor Mary Rose Wilcox, right, display a Phoenix Suns jersey in Spanish that Sharton will wear during a march protesting Arizona's controversial immigration bill during a news conference Wednesday, May 5, 2010, in Phoenix. Reverend Al Sharpton, left, and Maricopa County Supervisor Mary Rose Wilcox, right, display a Phoenix Suns jersey in Spanish that Sharton will wear during a march protesting Arizona's controversial immigration bill during a news conference Wednesday, May 5, 2010, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Paul Connors)
By Matt Paulson
AP Sports Writer / May 5, 2010

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PHOENIX—Suns fans wore "Los Suns" jerseys and T-shirts and a group of four even entered the arena with sombreros for their team's playoff game against the San Antonio Spurs.

There was a lone protester holding up a homemade sign outside the arena who was against the idea of the "Los Suns" jerseys Phoenix wore Wednesday night for Game 2 of its second-round series.

Otherwise, it was a typical game night around US Airways Center.

The Suns made headlines the day before with their decision to wear "Los Suns" jerseys on the Cinco de Mayo holiday. A new Arizona immigration law has drawn widespread criticism from Latino organizations and civil rights groups that say it could lead to racial profiling of Hispanics. President Barack Obama has called the law "misguided."

The protester, who identified herself only as Karen from Glendale, held a sign which read The Phoenix Suns support drug runners; armed coyotes; drop houses; extradition; forced labor; forced prostitution of illegals; murder of Arizona citizens on their own property; assault on law enforcement officers.

"I was disappointed that the ownership for the Suns organization decided to not support our state's efforts to do something about the problem we have on our borders," said the woman, who added she came to the arena only to protest.

"How they feel personally on their own time is one thing, but as an organization that has so much influence over public opinion -- it's like the outsiders that come in. Their views on the bill are distorted, too."

Pedro Flores of Phoenix came to the game wearing an Amare Stoudemire "Los Suns" jersey and said he's proud his team is taking a stand on the controversy.

"It's good and on Cinco de Mayo day," he said. "I think it's great."

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