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West not watching from home

Posted by Julian Benbow, Globe Staff  January 28, 2011 10:11 PM

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Delonte West traveled with a team and has an appointment set for after the road trip to see about being cleared to practice.

Making his first extended road trip since breaking his right (non-shooting) wrist in November, Delonte West prepared as if he would play today even though he won't likely return until the Celtics return to Boston.

In the past few weeks, West has progressed quickly, shooting with his right wrist braced, getting the brace removed, doing some light catching and dribbling last week and now absorbing harder passes this week. He said he has an appointment scheduled immediate after this four-game trip to determine the next step and possibly clear him to practice.

For now, he thought it was in his best interests to travel with the team.

Delonte West.JPG"With me trying to return shortly, it’s very important that I get a lot of time with the team," West said. "Really getting in the huddles and picking up on the flow of what’s going on out there. It’s not the same watching from home. You’ve got to be there. I’m making sure that I’m not slacking behind when I get back. I’m not missing out on anything. This is where the team’s at. This is where the coaches are at. This is where I’m at."

Knowing West was within weeks of returning to the court, Rivers wanted West to travel with the team.

"Whenever a guy gets close, we want him to be around because we may change a play, we may do something," Rivers said. "When they’re a long way away, we tell them they can go to the Bahamas if they want, but once they get close we want them around the team. It’s good for him and it’s good for the team."

The last test for West will be absorbing serious contact with the wrist. The fall he took Nov. 24 against New Jersey was gruesome, and West said he's afraid of falling again.

"If you look at a game, 90 percent of the time, when a player falls he puts his hand down in some kind of way," West said. "So that thought alone gives me nightmares."

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