A lucky shot with no paydirt

Posted by Zuri Berry, Boston.com Staff  February 16, 2011 08:53 AM

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You know those halftime shows, where they bring out some fun-loving fan to take a half-court shot or, in this case, a 175-foot slapper, for a prize.

Well, this is one of those cases where the guy makes the shot -- a gem might I add -- into a hole big enough for an oversized puck and then gets stonewalled for the winnings by an insurance company.

The shot, which would have entitled the man to $50,000, was made at the Allstate Good Hands Shootout hosted by the Indiana Ice, a minor league hockey team for their "Hockey for Heart" charity promotion. He had previously announced that he'd donate the money to charity. See the shot below.

Richard Marsh was the lucky fellow to nail the shot, gliding it across the ice with a controlled swing of his stick. Little did he know that he had no control over the payout, or the drama that would ensue

Allstate insurance, albeit the sponsor of the event, was not responsible for the payout, according to the Indianapolis Star. Instead, that responsibility fell upon on unnamed insurance company which deemed the shot illegal.

In the Star's report:


The United States Hockey League says in a news release that the insurance company voided the award because Marsh stood in front of a designated starting line -- too close to the target, in other words -- disqualifying him from the win.

The disqualification, if you can call it as much, has riled the Indianapolis community, with Allstate and the Ice taking grief for the actions of this yet-to-be named insurance company. The Ice has instead decided to make two donations to nonprofits (St. Vincent's Cardiovascular and the American Heart Association) to quell the outrage.

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