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This Bud's for him

Posted by Charles P. Pierce  June 27, 2011 03:49 PM

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In case you missed it, the Los Angeles Dodgers filed for bankruptcy today. The reason that they did so was because Bud Selig, commissioner of baseball, has determined that he doesn't want Frank McCourt to own the team any more. That is the only reasonable conclusion, since the commissioner vetoed a$3 billion rights deal with Fox because it was somehow "not in the best interest of the team" to keep McCourt afloat. If the commissioner's office has determined that your continued solvency is not in your team's best interest, the deck seems pretty well stacked against you. This, of course, comes at the same time that good ol' Bud is allowing the ownership of the New York Mets to go on its merry way despite the fact that it is neck-deep in one of the biggest financial scandals in the history of the Republic.

(Here's where This Blog is supposed to mention that the whole Dodgers thing goes back to the McCourt divorce case, which has gone on so long and has been so bloody that This Blog half-expects that Jamie McCourt's lawyers soon will attempt to enter Frank's house by hiding themselves in a huge wooden horse.)

It's a big summer for commissioners and the barefaced non-facts in which most of them deal.  Bud's determining who lives and who dies among his owners. Roger Goodell is trying to wrangle his owners into keeping all of their lies on the same page. And, of course, David Stern is in his own universe in this regard. Aficionados of management-speak will note the similarities between this story and what went on in the NFL. The lockout is spoken of as a sort of uncontrollable force of nature. If "agreement" is not "reached" by a certain date, the lockout will happen. This, of course, is foolish. The lockout will happen because management wants it to happen. Period. There's nothing accidental about it. If Stern really "doesn't want a lockout," he can choose not to have one.

And This Blog doubts very seriously that, when Stern goes to China to sell his product to investors there, and to the eleventy-kajillion potential consumers in the Asian market, he points out to them that nearly 74 percent of his franchises are losing money. This Blog believes he would keep that a little quiet.

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McCourt v. McCourt submitted to arbitration.
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