The Fall Experimental Football League logo. The FXFL will begin play in October. The Boston Brawlers will be one of the league’s first teams.
The Fall Experimental Football League logo. The FXFL will begin play in October. The Boston Brawlers will be one of the league’s first teams.

Boston is getting another professional football team.

And despite your obvious groans about more preseason football, the Fall Experimental Football League (FXFL) is expecting that its brand of football will be better than the semi-professional kind found in other leagues.

“I mean I’m getting inundated with phone calls and e-mails from guys on NFL rosters and their agents,” FXFL commissioner Brian Woods told Boston.com. “We’re not getting guys off the street or veterans. The on field product is going to be exceptional.”

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Typically, the players who will play on FXFL teams will have been cut from NFL rosters out of training camp, Woods said. NFL teams begin making cuts Aug. 26 and again on Aug. 30 to trim rosters from 90 to 53 players.

The FXFL will open Oct. 8 with one of its inaugural teams based in Boston. The Boston Brawlers will join the Omaha Mammoths, Brooklyn Bolts, and Miami Blacktips to play a six-game season for the four-team league that will begin Oct. 8. The Brawlers will play its home games at Harvard Stadium on Fridays while the league will typically play on Wednesday night.

“Boston we felt like was a good market for it,” Woods said. “For us this year, the most important thing was to have a quality on field product. To do that we wanted to start with fewer teams. We also felt like having a natural rivalry in a small league this year would be a good thing.”

The Brawlers, whose logo and mascot will be revealed later, are expected to be rivals with the Brooklyn Bolts.

“I wanted to go with something that went with Boston, that went with sports,” said Brawlers chief executive Michael Halem, a Harvard alumnus, of the forthcoming logo and mascot. “I think it will speak well for the city.”

Players will be paid $1,000 per game, with what commissioner Woods termed as flexible contracts for players to continue to support their dream at the NFL level. Tickets will average $30.

“This is a typical minor league, developmental league model,” Woods said. “This is a cost containing model.”