Washington Post Editorial Board Will No Longer Use ‘Redskins’ Name

Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder, left, talks with Cleveland Browns owner Jimmy Haslam before a preseason game.
Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder, left, talks with Cleveland Browns owner Jimmy Haslam before a preseason game.
Evan Vucci/Associated Press

The Washington Post editorial board wrote yesterday that it will no longer refer to the local NFL franchise by the “Redskins” name, joining a growing list of media organizations and members who have dropped the controversial name from its pages.

Via The Post:

...While we wait for the National Football League to catch up with thoughtful opinion and common decency, we have decided that, except when it is essential for clarity or effect, we will no longer use the slur ourselves. That’s the standard we apply to all offensive vocabulary, and the team name unquestionably offends not only many Native Americans but many other Americans, too.

The change will only apply to editorials:

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

Unlike our colleagues who cover sports and other news, we on the editorial board have the luxury of writing about the world as we would like it to be. Nor do we intend to impose our policy on our readers. If you write a letter about football and want to use the team name, we aren’t going to stop you.

Executive Editor Martin Baron said the newsroom will continue to use the name:

Standard operating policy in the newsroom has been to use the names that established institutions choose for themselves. That remains our policy, as we continue to vigorously cover controversy over the team’s name and avoid any advocacy role on this subject.

Other media members and organizations who have decided not to use the name include The Seattle Times, The Detroit News, the Orange County Register, the San Francisco Chronicle, and Sports Illustrated’s Peter King.