THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

'Brain attack' is caused primarily by blood clot

By Scott Allen
Globe Staff / February 18, 2005

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A stroke, sometimes called a "brain attack," occurs when blood flow to the brain is interrupted, bringing symptoms that can include temporary numbness and blindness and occasionally causing death. Four out of five strokes happen when a blood vessel is blocked by a clot, while the remaining ones occur when a blood vessel ruptures, spilling blood into the brain. (Full article: 439 words)

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