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Meriweather disagrees with call

Posted by Michael Vega, Globe Staff  November 15, 2010 11:43 AM

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Patriots safety Brandon Meriweather, sounding a bit groggy from Sunday night's 39-26 victory over Pittsburgh Steelers at Heinz Field, appeared on WEEI's "Dale and Holley Show'' this morning and discussed a number of topics pertaining to the Patriots' seventh win of the season.

Meriweather disagreed with a pass interference penalty he drew with 4:46 remaining in the third quarter.

"From the way the refs explained it to me, it was a good penalty, it was a good call,'' Meriweather said. "But me, personally, I didn't think I did anything wrong.''

Facing a first and 10 at the New England 46, Steelers QB Ben Roethlisberger fired an incomplete pass to Mike Wallace. Meriweather was called for a 38-yard defensive pass interference penalty that gave Pittsburgh a first-and-goal from the New England 8, where the Steelers came away empty handed after Jeff Reed missed a 26-yard field goal attempt wide right.

"When two people are going for the ball, there's going to be contact no matter how you want to put it,'' Meriweather said. "They told me the receiver still had the right to the ball and I can't go through him to go get the ball. I had to go around him.

"So, with that explanation, it was a great call, but from my perspective of the rules, I think it shouldn't have been called, period.''

Asked what his coaches said to him about the call, Meriweather said, "Nothing. They just told me to keep playing aggressive, keep going for the ball, and keep doing exactly what I was doing."

When asked about the challenges of facing the Steelers' receiving corps, Meriweather said, "It's more about taking on their quarterback. Wallace is the fastest dude in the league and you've always got to be ready to cover the deep route and get him on something where he can catch a nice route and outrun everybody. Other than that, it's more about facing Ben that's the problem, because he's so hard to bring down to the point where a receiver goes uncovered. Nobody can cover them forever and eventually they're going to get open. so when Ben is scrambling around it gives them a little extra time to get open.''


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