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Each side states its case

Posted by Greg A. Bedard  March 11, 2011 10:20 PM

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Here are the proposals that each side said they put forth. Of course, they're light on the details -- and the Artist Formerly Known as the Union did more picking apart the NFL's proposals. But here they are for your perusal:

FROM THE NFL:

1. We more than split the economic difference between us, increasing our proposed cap for 2011 significantly and accepting the Union’s proposed cap number for 2014 ($161 million per club).

2. An entry level compensation system based on the Union’s “rookie cap” proposal, rather than the wage scale proposed by the clubs. Under the NFL proposal, players drafted in rounds 2-7 would be paid the same or more than they are paid today. Savings from the first round would be reallocated to veteran players and benefits.

3. A guarantee of up to $1 million of a player’s salary for the contract year after his injury – the first time that the clubs have offered a standard multi-year injury guarantee.

4. Immediate implementation of changes to promote player health and safety by:

* Reducing the off-season program by five weeks, reducing OTAs from 14 to 10, and limiting on-field practice time and contact;
* Limiting full-contact practices in the preseason and regular season; and
* Increasing number of days off for players.

5. Commit that any change to an 18-game season will be made only by agreement and that the 2011 and 2012 seasons will be played under the current 16-game format.

6. Owner funding of $82 million in 2011-12 to support additional benefits to former players, which would increase retirement benefits for more than 2000 former players by nearly 60 percent.

7. Offer current players the opportunity to remain in the player medical plan for life.

8. Third party arbitration for appeals in the drug and steroid programs.

9. Improvements in the Mackey plan, disability plan, and degree completion bonus program.

10. A per-club cash minimum spend of 90 percent of the salary cap over three seasons.


FROM THE NFL PLAYERS ASSOCIATION:

Issues which prevented a new NFL Collective Bargaining Agreement from being reached:

* The NFL demanded a multi-billion dollar giveback and refused to provide any legitimate financial information to justify it.

* The NFL’s offer on March 7 to give the NFLPA a single sheet of numbers was NOT financial disclosure. The players’ accountants and bankers advised that the “offered” information was meaningless: only two numbers for each year.

* The NFL wanted to turn the clock back on player compensation by four years, moving them back to where they were in 2007.

* The NFL offered no proposal at all for long-term share of revenues.

* NFL demanded 100% of all revenues which went above unrealistically low projections for the first four years.

* The NFL refused to meet the players on significant changes to in-season, off-season or pre-season health and safety rules.

* The NFL kept on the table its hypocritical demand for an 18-game season, despite its public claims to be working toward improving the heath and safety of players.

* The NFL wanted cutbacks in payer workers’ compensation benefits for injured players.

* The NFL sought to limit rookie compensation long after they become veterans — into players’ fourth and fifth years

* THE PLAYERS WANT TO KEEP PLAYING
o The players offered repeatedly to continue working under the existing CBA, but were rejected by the NFL five times.
o Despite publicly admitting no club was losing money, that TV ratings, sponsorship money, etc. were at an all time high, the NFL continued to insist on an 18-percent rollback in the players’ share of revenues and continue to deny the NFLPA’s request for justification.

News, analysis and commentary from Boston.com's staff writers and contributors, including Zuri Berry and Erik Frenz.

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