The Bruins’ Patrice Bergeron has his HC Lugano sweater in hand as the lockout continues.
The Bruins’ Patrice Bergeron has his HC Lugano sweater in hand as the lockout continues.
karl mathis/associated press

The NHL and the players’ association quietly resumed collective bargaining talks Friday and expect to be in contact again in the upcoming days.

NHL commissioner Gary Bettman and deputy commissioner Bill Daly met with union head Donald Fehr and special counsel Steve Fehr in the NHLPA office on the 20th day of the NHL lockout.

‘‘We met with the Union today in Toronto,’’ Daly told the Associated Press in an e-mail. ‘‘We are supposed to touch base over the weekend. Nothing more to report right now.’’

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NHLPA spokesman Jonathan Weatherdon said any discussions this weekend won’t be in person.

The meeting on Friday marked the first negotiating session since talks broke off Tuesday in New York, where the sides had met four times in five days to discuss issues other than core economics.

No specifics were given about Friday’s negotiations.

‘‘Just general discussion of where we are and how to move the process forward,’’ Daly said.

The sides hadn’t been expected to get together before next week, and the meeting didn’t become public until it was over. It took place one day after the NHL canceled the first two weeks of the regular season, wiping out 82 games from Oct. 11-24.

“We were extremely disappointed to have to make today’s announcement,” Daly said Thursday. “The game deserves better, the fans deserve better, and the people who derive income from their connection to the NHL deserve better.

“We remain committed to doing everything in our power to forge an agreement that is fair to the players, fair to the teams and good for our fans. This is not about ‘winning’ or ‘losing’ a negotiation.

“This is about finding a solution that preserves the long-term health and stability of the league and the game. We are committed to getting this done.”

Blues’ Davidson done

John Davidson, who spent six years rebuilding the St. Louis Blues as president of hockey operations, is leaving the team.

Davidson, 59, and the team agreed to a buyout of his contract, which has three years and approximately $6 million remaining on it. Terms were not disclosed.

‘‘We would like to thank JD for his commitment and dedication to the Blues organization over the past six seasons,’’ team chairman Tom Stillman said. ‘‘He has been instrumental in revitalizing the Blues franchise and has built a strong foundation for our organization, which will ensure the club’s success well into the future.’’

Davidson was hired by the previous ownership group, led by Dave Checketts, on June 30, 2006, to revitalize a franchise that had seemingly become disconnected with its fan base.