THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
Bruins Notebook

Chara’s status up in the air

Captain makes trip with team

By Nancy Marrapese-Burrell
Globe Staff / April 18, 2011

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

Your article has been sent.

Text size +

Bruins coach Claude Julien wasn’t very forthcoming yesterday when asked about the status of captain Zdeno Chara, who missed Game 2 of the Eastern Conference quarterfinal series against the Canadiens Saturday night because of dehydration caused by a virus.

The towering defenseman, who skated during warm-ups but was dizzy and weak and couldn’t suit up for the game, made the trip to Montreal yesterday, but Julien wouldn’t say whether he will play tonight in Game 3.

“No further update on Zdeno,’’ said the coach. “He’s been in touch with our doctors and our medical staff and he will be traveling with the team. So that’s basically all I’m going to say about that.’’

When asked about potential lineup changes, such as installing rookie Tyler Seguin into the lineup after scratching him the first two games, or giving goaltender Tuukka Rask a shot, Julien said he’d take a page out of Flyers coach Peter Laviolette’s book from Saturday night.

“We don’t discuss lineups, we don’t discuss goaltenders, and we don’t discuss our injuries,’’ he said. “I like that and I’ll give him credit for that one.’’

Given the number of gaffes by the blue liners in the first two contests, Julien was asked if they were out of their comfort zone. He said he didn’t believe they were.

“I think our [defense isn’t] out of their comfort zone,’’ said the coach. “I think it’s more the type of mistakes that we’ve made that have been costly and that has nothing to do with the comfort zone that they’re out of rather than making the right decisions.

“When you’re down, 2-0, you take the responsibility that comes with your team. But you don’t ignore that the other team [is] doing good things. The amount of shots we’ve had, the amount of time we’ve had in their zone . . . the inability to score is something that we have to correct. But they are really collapsing and doing a good job of keeping everything they can away from their goaltender, and when they need their goaltender to make the save, he’s there.

“It’s indicative in the scoring chances, it’s indicative in the shots we’ve had, but we have to find solutions. Now, on the other end of it, we can’t keep pushing ourselves out of the game early like we’ve done so far in both games. You give up early goals and you see how they [the Canadiens] play, it’s always a tough task to get yourselves back in games, so we’ve got to get better in those areas.’’

Positively upbeat Center David Krejci, who has been shut out in the first two games, said he believes his scoring touch is going to come soon. Krejci and linemates — Nathan Horton and Milan Lucic — have been stymied in the series, particularly by the Montreal defense pairing of Hal Gill and P.K. Subban.

The Habs blocked 27 Boston shots in Game 2 compared with the Bruins’ 8.

“They got quick goals, not just last game but the game before, too,’’ said Krejci. “It’s not easy to play against a team like that when they have the lead. They sit back and they play pretty well defensively. We can’t let it happen again. We’ve got to be different at the beginning and get the first goal so we can control the game.’’

Krejci said he hopes people don’t think the series is over because the team is trailing, two games to none, heading into Montreal.

“It looks like people just are kind of writing us off,’’ he said. “It’s a 2-0 lead. We can win the next game and the whole series will change.’’

He admitted it was hard not to get frustrated by the way the Canadiens play when they’re ahead.

“A little bit, but once the game finishes, you have to just forget about it,’’ he said. “If you keep it inside, it is going to eat you alive. Just forget about it, move on, and get ready for the next game.’’

Randell signed General manager Peter Chiarelli announced that the team had signed forward Tyler Randell, 19, to an entry-level contract. Terms of the deal were not revealed. Randell had 32 points, 20 goals, in 68 games with the Ontario League’s Kitchener Rangers. He led the team in penalty minutes with 160 and his 19 regular-season fighting majors tied for second in the OHL. Randell was selected by the Bruins in the sixth round (No. 176 overall) of the 2009 draft.

Nancy Marrapese-Burrell can be reached at marrapese@globe.com.

Bruins Video