< Back to front page Text size +

Hall's winning pedigree stands out

Posted by Fluto Shinzawa, Globe Staff  June 22, 2010 11:21 AM

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

Tyler Seguin is the playmaking, three-zone, right-shot center with loads of hockey sense, a heavy wrister, and a shifty approach to creating offense.

Taylor Hall is the all-out, get-out-of-my-way left wing who doesn't mind bowling through defensemen to get to pucks and enter the dirty areas.

But aside from the variances in their games is the difference in their overall team success. Hall has won consecutive Memorial Cups and was named MVP both times, which has never happened in CHL history. Seguin hasn't won, and was swept by Hall and the Spitfires in the second round of the OHL playoffs. When Hall and Team Canada fell to the Americans in the gold medal game of the World Junior Tournament, Seguin was back in Plymouth, having been cut by Hockey Canada.

"Taylor Hall has done it all," said Central Scouting Bureau director E.J. McGuire. "He's the only guy to win the Memorial Cup MVP twice in a row. Tyler Seguin didn't make the world junior team. Taylor Hall had better people to pass to him. But the counter is that Tyler Seguin plays more minutes because his teammates aren't as good as Hall. There's that back and forth. That's how close they are. They had the exact same [points]. But Hall played in six less games because he was at world juniors."

Hall, who counted 2008 first-round pick Ryan Ellis and Cam Fowler (a possible top-five pick on Friday) among his Windsor teammates, has had the better supporting cast the past two seasons.

To that end, the Bruins projected how Seguin would have performed in Hall's spot, and vice versa, to get a clearer picture of the two prospects.

"We went through that exercise with the amateur staff," said GM Peter Chiarelli. "Windsor had a very strong team. We looked closely at the whole Windsor-Plymouth series. You could see heavy, heavy checking on Tyler. We do the same as projecting Tyler in Taylor's spot by putting Taylor in Tyler's spot. Tyler didn't make the world junior team. Taylor did. We've been going through this with a fine-tooth comb -- the differences in their game, the subtle differences in their personality. It really is that close. Had Tyler been in Taylor's skates these past two years, who knows? It might have been the same. It might have been different. It's important to go through that exercise."

News, analysis and commentary from the following Boston Globe writers:

NHL video

archives

browse this blog

by category