New England Patriots vs New York Jets, 10/16/2014, at Gillette Stadium ... Find Tickets

 
< Back to front page Text size +

Julien wants Bruins to stay classy

Posted by Chad Finn, Globe Staff  June 7, 2011 12:24 AM

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

Canucks forward Alexandre Burrows has established himself as an official Bruins nemesis this series. In Game 1, he bit Patrice Bergeron and escaped without consequences from the league. The unjust development aggravated the Bruins and their fans further when he scored the winning goal 11 seconds into overtime in Game 2.

Burrows has left his mark on this series in more ways than one, which is why it must be tempting for the Bruins to try to agitate him like he agitates them.

The frustration was magnified in Game 2, when fellow Canuck pest Maxim Lapierre taunted Bergeron by trying to stick his fingers in his mouth during the third period.

The Bruins couldn't resist minor attempts at retaliation tonight. Normally mild-mannered Mark Recchi wagged his finger at Lapierre in the first period tonight, and Milan Lucic did the same to Burrows the third period of the Bruins' 8-1 rout.

While Lucic's actions brought cheers from the crowd, it earned an opposite reaction from coach Claude Julien, who doesn't want his team getting caught up in the retaliation game.

"I'll tell you what. I said this morning that I wouldn't accept it on our team," Julien said when asked for his reaction to Lucic's pointing. "It happened a couple of times tonight. They've been told that I don't want any of that stuff. You know, like I said, you got to live by your words. It was disappointing for me to see that happen after what I said this morning . . . Emotions got the better of them. I'm going to stand here and say I'm
not accepting it. The guys have been told."

Recchi, the 43-year-old veteran of 23 seasons, admitted Julien let him know he didn't approve.

"I got in trouble for that. Coach gave me heck for that," Recchi said.

But he didn't sound entirely contrite.

"You know, it's emotional out there. But it won't happen again," Recchi said. "You know, it's an emotional game. You get involved. Obviously when it happens to one of your teammates, they kind of mock you a little bit, when it happened in Game 1, it was a little bit -- you know, it's a little bit of frustration on our part. It is what it is, and we'll forget about it and get ready for the next game."


News, analysis and commentary from the following Boston Globe writers:

NHL video

archives

browse this blog

by category