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Figure skating

Kim Yu Na in lead for women's figure skating, but her competition is close

Posted by Staff February 19, 2014 06:52 PM

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South Korea's Kim Yu Na performed in the women's figure skating short program at the Iceberg Skating Palace during the Sochi Winter Olympics on February 19, 2014. (Adrian Dennis /AFP PHOTO / Getty Images)

They call Kim Yu Na “the queen” for a reason. The South Korean skater ruled the ice four years ago in Vancouver, and appears to have no intention of relinquishing her crown. The skater that took a “hiatus” for almost two years is better than ever. Kim’s short program was flawless. Her jumps have height, distance and feather light landings.

Kim deserves to be in first place going into the free skate, except this time she doesn’t lead by a mile. Instead Kim has two skaters nipping at her heels. Less than one point separates the top three ladies.

A Russian teenager sits in second place, and not the Russian we thought it would be. Adelina Sotnikova now carries Russia’s hopes for gold. She wore a bright red dress and brought a killer instinct into her short program. The 17 year old will be carrying the weight of Russia on her shoulders into the free skate, and something tells me it won’t be a problem.

The rising Russian star was supposed to be 15 year old Julian Lipnitskaia, who performed so beautifully in the team competition. She fell on her triple flip in Thursday's short, and that was that.

The most artistic and pleasing to the eye performance in the short belonged to Italy’s Carolina Kostner. She was flawless in her white dress skating to the classic Ave' Maria. I’ve seen my share of Ave’ Maria’s through the years, and none better than Kostner’s.

The Italian skater is no stranger to the Olympic stage. This is her third Winter Games, and she skates like a veteran. The bronze medal will be either hers or go to American Gracie Gold.

Gold has learned how to be a competitor under new coach Frank Carroll. In the short program you need to fight through each element and stand up, which is exactly what Gold did. In my mind, Gold is without a doubt worthy of the Olympic podium.

So are the three skaters ahead of her.

In fifth we have Lipnitskaia who appears to have lost the wind from her sails. Maybe all the hype that has followed her the past week has caught up to her. Once the Russian hockey team lost it was all on her. Too much pressure.

No worries for Lipnitskaia. She is 15, and could easily be around for the next two Olympics.

American Ashley Wagner sits in 6th place. Wagner came out of the gate like a caged beast. She easily is the best thing that ever happened to Pink Floyd. A two footed landing on the triple combination cost her some valuable points.

I like how Wagner is bringing an attitude to her skating. After getting the Olympic nod in a storm of controversy, Wagner is making a statement. She is proving to be completely Olympic worthy- and that’s a win for her.

Rounding out the American girls is Polina Edmonds. At the U.S. Championships in January this young skater came out of nowhere to place second. Edmunds rocked her “cha-cha” one more time. The program had great jumps and lots of energy. Her seventh place finish after the short is very impressive and bodes very well for the future.

It all comes down to the free skate. Woody Allen talked about 30 seconds of fame. Each of these ladies will get four minutes, and it promises to be epic.

Kim takes home the gold

Posted by Scott Thurston, Globe Staff February 25, 2010 09:49 PM


VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- South Korea's Kim Yu Na, skating with the weight of a country on her tiny shoulders, delivered a superb performance and ran away with the gold before a packed Pacific Coliseum.

Kim landed a beautiful triple lutz/triple toe opening combination that set the tone for her skate, which resulted in a world-record score of 228.56 -- a personal best by more than 18 points.

She became the first reigning world champion to win Olympic gold since American Tara Lipinski in 1998.

"I can't believe it,'' said Kim, 19. "I did my performances very clean. I don't know why I cried. This is the first time I have cried after my performance and i'm surprised I cried.''

Japan's Mao Asada took the silver with a 205.50, and Canadian Joannie Rochette won bronze (202.64) and the admiration of all those who watched,

"I feel proud and the result did not matter,'' said Rochette, skating just days after the death of her mother. "I'm happy to be on the podium. It was a lifetime project for me and my mom, and we achieved that.''

US teenager Mirai Nagasu turned in an excellent effort for a girl making her world debut and climbed from sixth after the short program to finish fourth. Teammate Rachael Flatt finished seventh.

"I think my best years are yet to come,'' said Nagasu. "At 16, you don't have the experience and the maturity that they [the medalists] skate with, so hopefully I will. I just thought about how I wanted to get here. It's been my dream since i was a little girl.

"I'm sorry I wasn't able to keep the USA trend of making the podium. I hope I can make it up at the next Olympics.''

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Update, 11:41: Rochette brings the Canadian crowd to its feet. Despite staggering out of the triple flip and skipping the late double axel, a very credible performance, especially in the wake of her mother's death. Blowing kisses to her mother in the kiss-and-cry.Should be good for bronze, unless Mirai Nagasu has a perfect skate.

If she makes the podium, it's the first medal by a Canadian woman since Liz Manley's silver in 1988 in Calgary.

Update: 11:37: Even with the two triple axels, which might have been downgraded for incomplete rotations, the double-footed triple flip on the triple-double-double combination and the singled triple loop did Mao Asada in. Canadian favorite
Joannie Rochette is next.

Update, 11:29: A superb skate under great pressure. Hitting the triple-triple was vital and landing the flip was key. If she wins, she'll be the first reigning world champion to win Olympic gold since Tara Lipinski in 1998. Bet the house.

The gold medal could be decided in the first 30 seconds. Asada has to hit both triple axels to have a chance and even then it might not be enough.

Update, 11:23: Kim Yu Na is next. She had a lead of nearly 5 points over Mao Asada after the short program but has a less demanding free skate since she doesn't do a triple axel. Her most difficult element is in the beginning -- a triple lutz-triple toe combination. But her next jump -- the triple flip -- may be trickier. She fell on it at Skate America, where Rachael Flatt beat her in the long program.
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Update, 11:13: Miki Ando of Japan is up next. She is a former world champion and the reigning bronze med\alist. Since she's more than 6 points behind Joannie Rochette in fourth, she'll need a near-perfect performance to move up because she has the easiest program of the contenders......

Nice program by Ando, but she lost some points by doing the triple loop instead of the flip and had to fight to land the triple toe. Since Rochette's planned jumps are more then 3 points higher, it'll be a stretch to medal.

Update, 11:11: Rachael Flatt of the US begins her program at precisely 11:06 and turns in a typically rock-solid skate She'll get a 10 percent bonus for her final seven jumps because they came in the second half of her program. The performance will put substantial pressure on Miki Ando and Joannie Rochette to perform cleanly.....

The marks are in and she was hit with downgraded scoring, probably for trouble with the first lutz. She sits in second.

Update, 10:22 p.m.: The planned program and song for the top six, with a couple of things worth noting. Japan's Mao Asada, in second place, will open with a triple axel and a triple axel/double toe combination. None of the other five will attempt a triple axel, rarely seen in women's skating.. However, the triple LUTZ/triple toe combination is worth more than Asada's triple/double combination, and the triple FLIP/triple toe combo is worth just as much. Got it?


RACHAEL FLATT, US (Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini)
Double axel
Triple flip/triple toe
Triple lutz
Flying camel spin
Change foot upright spin
Triple loop
Triple lutz/double toe
Spiral sequence
Triple flip/double toe/double loop
Triple salchow
Circular step sequence
Flying change foot combination spin

MIKI ANDO, Japan (Cleopatra)
Triple lutz/double loop
Triple salchow/double axel sequence
Triple flip
Change foot combination spin
Spiral sequence
Triple lutz
Triple salchow
Flying sit spin
Triple toe
Double axel/double loop/double loop
Straight line step sequence
Flying combination spin

KIM YU NA, South Korea (Concerto in F, Gershwin)
Triple lutz/triple toe
Triple flip
Double axel/double toe/double loop
Flying combination spin
Spiral sequence
Double axel/triple toe
Triple salchow
Triple lutz
Straight line step sequence
Double axel
Flying sit spin
Change foot combination spin

MAO ASADA, Japan (Bells of Moscow, Rachmaninoff)
Triple axel
Triple axel/double toe
Triple flip/double loop
Flying sit spin
Spiral sequence
Triple loop
Triple flip/double loop/double loop
Triple toe
Double axel
Flying combination spin
Straight line step sequence
Change foot combination spin

JOANNIE ROCHETTE, Canada (Samson and Delilah, St. Saens)
Triple lutz/double toe/double loop
Triiple flip
Triple loop
Flying change foot sit spin
Spiral sequence
Triple lutz
Triple toe/triple salchow sequence
Double axel/double axel sequence
Change foot combination spin
Triple salchow
Circular step sequence
Flying sit spin

MIRAI NAGASU, US (Carmen selection)
Triple lutz/double toe/double loop
Double axel/triple toe
Triple flip
Flying sit spin
Layback spin
Spiral sequence
Triple lutz
Triple loop/double axel sequence
Double axel
Triple toe
Straight line step sequence
Change foot combination spin


*********

VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- They're underway in the women's free skate at Pacific Coliseum, but the final group -- the top six after Tuesday's short program -- won't take the ice until after 11 p.m. EST. So if you're only into watching the medal contenders, feel free to tune into your other prime-time shows and check back here,

Our resident expert on figure skating and everything Olympic, John Powers, will be providing instant analysis at the end of each four-minute routine..

Here's the order in which the podium hopefuls will skate:

Rachael Flatt, US (fifth after short program) at 11:06
Miki Ando, Japan (fourth) at 11:13
Kim Yu Na, Korea (first) at 11:21
Mao Asada, Japan (second) at 11:29
Joannie Rochette, Canada (third) at 11:37
Mirai Nagasu, US (sixth) at 11:45

We'll post the planned routines for each skater shortly.

Daily snapshot: February 25

Posted by Chad Finn, Globe Staff February 25, 2010 12:43 AM

Familiar foes: Can we admit it now? A US-Canada showdown in the women's gold medal game was inevitable from the beginning, or at the very least once it was clear this young, rebuilt version of the US team would not take Sweden -- which pulled off a stunning upset over the Americans in 2006 at Turin, Italy -- lightly. But that's not to suggest it's a tired rivalry. The US enters as underdogs searching for its first gold since 1998. Canada enters as the favorite, and its should be bolstered by a rowdy home crowd that thirsts for gold. But only a fool writes off a team that has Jenny Potter and Angela Ruggiero on its side. Expect another memorable chapter to the rivalry. 6:30 p.m.

Competition and emotion: South Korea's Kim Yu Na, who was spectacular in the short program Tuesday night, comes in to the women's free program as the heavy favorite to win gold. But all eyes -- including more than a few teary ones -- will be on Canada's Joannie Rochette, who mustered the strength to finish third in the short program despite the sudden death of her mother, Therese, of a heart attack Sunday. One programming note: Be sure to check back right here tonight, when the Globe's John Powers provides instant analysis during and after the program. 8 p.m.

And don't forget . . . Jeret Peterson takes to the air at Cypress Mountain in the finals of the men's aerials. He says he will break out "The Hurricane," his daring -- and incredibly dangerous, given its five midair spins and three flips -- signature move. If he lands it, he could leave with some gold. 9 p.m.

Kim wins short program

Posted by John Powers, Globe Staff February 24, 2010 12:01 AM

South Korean world champion Kim Yu Na took the first step toward her country's first Olympic figure skating title tonight when she easily won the short program ahead of Japan's Mao Asada. "The burden of competing here was not as much as I thought it would be," said the 19-year-old Kim, after she had outpointed the previous global titlist by 78.50 to 73.78. The 78.50 is a world best.

In third was Canada's Joannie Rochette, who was competing only three days after the death of her mother Therese from a heart attack after she'd arrived here to watch her daughter bid for the first gold medal by a Canadian woman since Barbara Ann Scott in 1948.

Rochette, who slapped hands with coach Manon Perron at the dasher just before she went out to skate, turned in her best performance of the season, a remarkably composed and courageous effort that began with a solid triple lutz-double toe combination and ended without fault. Then when the music stopped and the crowd rose and roared in admiration, Rochette burst into tears. Yet even though she skated cleanly, the difficulty of her program couldn't match that of Kim and Asada. Kim landed a triple lutz-triple toe and Asada a triple axel-double toe, the first triple axel combo by a woman in Olympic history.

In fifth place behind former Japanese world champion Miki Ando was US champion Rachael Flatt, who skated a clean program highlighted by a triple flip-triple toe combo. In sixth was teammate Mirai Nagasu, who fought off an untimely nosebleed to turn in a solid skate.

Had Nagasu tried the triple lutz-triple toe combination that she'd planned she might have placed higher but a wobbly warmup landing convinced her not to take the risk, so she opted for a triple-double. "From today's performance I don't think I can make the podium," Nagasu reckoned, "so I'm a little bit disappointed.".

Catching up with Kristi Yamaguchi

Posted by Scott Thurston, Globe Staff February 23, 2010 09:48 AM
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VANCOUVER, British Columbia — The custom-made costumes and the kiss-and-cry area are now just wonderful memories that fade more and more each Olympiad. It’s been 18 years since Kristi Yamaguchi twirled and jumped her way to gold in Albertville, France, and in that time she became a professional skater, a Hall of Famer, a commentator, a wife, and even a champion again.

‘‘Dancing with the Stars,’’ of course.

All that’s nice, but if you really want to see her eyes light up, ask her about something else she became: A mom.

‘‘The biggest reward and accomplishment of my life,’’ she beams, referring to daughters Keara, 6, and Emma, 4, she had with husband Bret Hedican, a former Olympian and NHL player.

And sounding just like a mother, she quickly adds, ‘‘I still can’t believe when I look at them how fast they grow.’’

Yamaguchi, now an even-harder-to-believe 38, is here with Proctor & Gamble as part of the company’s ‘Thanks, Mom’’ program which helps defray the costs of travel and accommodations for the mothers of some 200 Team USA members.

‘‘It’s really a neat program and I think invaluable to the US athletes,’’ she says, relaxing in the beauty salon and spa at the five-level P&G Family Home, which includes a spacious lounge. ‘‘I think for the athletes it’s so important to have their unconditional support system here.

‘‘My mom [Carole] is here and I’m not even competing!’’

Having that support system will be certainly be important for the two young US hopefuls in the women’s competition that begins tonight (neither of whom were born when Yamaguchi captured America’s heart in ’92), 16-year-old Mirai Nagasu and 17-year-old Rachel Flatt. Both are considered long shots.

‘‘It should be fun for them,’’ said Yamaguchi. ‘‘I think they just need to sit back and enjoy it and do what they can. I personally think they have an outside chance to make the podium. I know there aren’t any expectations, they don’t have the pressure on them to do that because they don’t have the experience.

‘‘If there are mistakes at the top, we all know Olympic competition is like no other, the pressure sometimes gets to the competitors. If there are mistakes, the door’s open. When you don’t have the expectations, you’re out there to have fun, and you have a little more fire in you.’’

Thinking back to her experience, ‘‘In some ways, I deflected a lot of pressure by giving myself the option to compete after that and continue on to ’94,’’ said Yamaguchi, who opted to pursue a pro career.

With evolution comes more revolutions for the kids today, who perform triple lutzes as a matter of routine. Still. some of the figure skating cognoscenti believe the program Yamaguchi skated in the ’92 Games would hold up well.

‘‘Wow, who are they?’’ she said with a laugh. ‘‘Well, that’s really nice. I, at the time, was hoping to be one, along with Midori Ito, who was pushing the envelope in women’s figure skating. And even though I was labeled more the artistic skater, I think I took a lot of pride in the technical side as well, doing the triple-triple at the Olympics and hoping to see women doing six, seven, triples consistently.

‘‘But it’s nice to know people feel that way.’’

Canadians, US 1-2 in dance

Posted by John Powers, Globe Staff February 23, 2010 12:06 AM

VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- It took them half a century's worth of slips and shortfalls and one sordid scandal, but the Canadians finally won the Olympic gold medal in figure skating that had eluded them since 1960.

Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir won last night's free dance inside the Pacific Coliseum to outpoint US couple Meryl Davis and Charlie White, 221.57 to 215.74. Taking the bronze were Russian world champions Oksana Domnina and Maxim Shabalin, who edged 2006 silver medalists Tanith Belbin and Ben Agosto of the US, 207.64 to 203.07.

“To be standing on the podium with Tessa and Scott is amazing,” said Davis. “There is so much to be proud of right now.”

It also was the first time the Canadians had won the ice dance and the first time that they had made the podium since Tracy Wilson and Robert McCall earned bronze in Calgary in 1988. Although Jamie Sale and David Pelletier were awarded a share of the 2002 pairs gold with Russia's Elena Berezhnaya and Anton Sikharulidze in the wake of the Salt Lake judging controversy, it was the first time Canada actually had won a title on the ice since Barbara Wagner and Robert Paul won the pairs in 1960.

Davis and White, who'd finished just four-100ths of a point behind Virtue and Moir in fourth place at last year's world championships in Los Angeles, had climbed from third place after the compulsory dance to second after the original dance, 2.60 points behind the Canadians. The Americans had hoped to put two couples on the podium for the first time, but Belbin and Agosto were unable to make up ground on the Russians.

“This is very emotional,” said White. “It’s for our family, for our friends, for our coaches. All that hard work has paid off.”

Daily snapshot: February 22

Posted by Chad Finn, Globe Staff February 22, 2010 12:04 AM

Semi-tough? The women's hockey semifinals begin at noon when the United States takes on Sweden. The US, led by hat-trick specialist Jenny Potter, has been rolling, outscoring its three Group B opponents, 31-1. But if the US men's hockey team's instant-classic 5-3 victory over Canada last night wasn't reminder enough that upsets can happen, all the US women have to do is remember Turin, Italy four years ago, when they were stunned by -- yep, Sweden -- in the semifinals. 3 p.m.

And don't forget . . . Meryl Davis and Charlie White of the US enter tonight's free dance trailing Canada's Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir by 2.60 points in the ice dancing competition. Tanith Belbin and Ben Agosto of the US, silver medalists in Turin, are fourth. We're pretty sure there won't be any controversial Aboriginal costumes in this one, but I suppose you never know. 7:45 p.m.


Daily snapshot: February 21

Posted by Chad Finn, Globe Staff February 21, 2010 01:13 AM


The showdown: The Americans lead Group A with six points, one more than the Canad . . . oh, who needs stats and standings? This one is the coveted ticket here in Vancouver, and the matchup is almost as much about emotion and national pride as it is a shot at the quarterfinals. I learned that from the roughly 62,000 people wearing red "Crosby 87" jerseys in the streets right now. 7:40 p.m.

And don't forget . . . Bode Miller has a bronze in the downhill and a silver in the super-G. Do we hear a gold in the super combined? 3:15 p.m. . . . Tanith Belbin and her partner Ben Agosto are in fourth place entering tonight's original dance (7:15 p.m.). We know Johnny Weir will be cheering for them -- Belbin is his roommate during the Olympics.

Lysacek wins the gold

Posted by Scott Thurston, Globe Staff February 18, 2010 08:26 PM


VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- Reigning world champion Evan Lysacek can add Olympic gold to his medal collection.

Skating a flawless artistic program, Lysacek proved he didn't need a quadruple jump in his program to overtake Russian Evgeni Plushenko and record the first US victory in the event since Brian Boitano in 1988.

Every American man who has been reigning world champion (Dick Button 1952, Hayes Jenkins 1956, David Jenkins 1960, Scott Hamilton 1984) has won the Olympic title. But no world champion since Hamilton had won it. (Boitano was not world champion in 1988.)

"It's been a tough couple of days,'' said Lysacek after the victory ceremony. "I was nervous, but that comes from wanting it so badly. I saw that American flag go up and I couldn't believe it was for me.''

It came down to the component scoring. Plushenko, who on the gold in the 2006 Turin Games, didn't do the full quad-triple-double, barely saved the axel, and had rough landings on both lutzes. Thus, he gave away most of his technical jumping edge.

Lysacek beat Plushenko, 257.67-256.36, a 1.31-point advantage. The difference came down to a missed opportunity by the Russian in that quad-triple-double. The jump was supposed to end with a double loop, a simple maneuver that is worth 1.5 points. It would have been enough for the top spot.

"I thought that he looked great,'' said Lysacek of his rival. "He had a great skate. It wasn't about gold, silver, or bronze for me. That was a great skate.''
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Lysacek was the first of the final six skaters to compete. "Worlds rejuvenated my love for skating, but it also confirmed to me that the most important thing about figure skating is the daily training that goes on at home,;; he said as he waited for all the marks to come in. This year I've worked harder than I ever have before to prepare for this competition. The whole season has been building toward this and waiting for that clean skate the whole season, and to get it in most important moment is pretty special.

“I wasn’t even tired at the end, the crowd and everything kept me going.”

Japan's Daisuke Takahaski took home the bronze. Johnny Weir finished sixth with a score of 238.87 and Jeremy Abbott, the reigning US champion, came in ninth (218.96)

***
Update, 11:52 p.m.The big question was what Johnny would wear (a glittering silver and black ensemble), but he turned in a solid skate, drawing a standing ovation from the crowd at Pacific Coliseum. Master of hyperbole Scott Hamilton says it was his best skate ever. However, Weir skipped the opening quad and didn't do the triple axel-triple toe. He just didn't do enough and could only move into fifth place. Fans are booing the marks, but they don't see the element scoring.

Update: 11:38 p.m. Stephane Lambiel of Switzerland, the reigning Olympic silver medalist and two-time world champion, came out of retirement this year. He was sitting fifth coming in, but turned in an uninspired performance and couldn't overtake Lysacek .....and Japan's Daisuke Takahashi is down, failing to land a quad toe. He took a big risk and it didn't pay off. But a solid and energetic recovery and he moves into second.. Johnny Weir is next.

Update: 11:33 p.m.. Nobunari Oda, who was in fourth place coming in, broke a skate lace and the program interruption is a mandatory 2-point deduction. Had he not resumed within three minutes, he would have been disqualified. As it is, the mishap probably cost him any chance at a medal.

Update, 11:27 p.m. For the record, Powers reports that the nine judges (no countries are listed in the new system) are from the US, Canada, Russia, Slovenia, Slovakia, Ukraine, Czech Republic, France, and Sweden. Five are from former Eastern Bloc socialist countries. The computer randomly drops two; seven judges count.

Update, 11:15 p.m.: No quad jump for Lysacek, but a technically solid skate. He was clean (with a good save on the second triple axel) but very deliberate, if not tentative on the jumps. If Plushenko also is clean, Plushenko probably wins.

Update, 11:09 p.m.: The leaders are warming up.. Counting base jump values only (no spins or footwork) Russian Evgeni Plushenko has a 59.3 to 55.0 edge on Evan Lysacek, which means that Lysacek has no margin for error on other stuff and needs better component (i.e., artistic) marks. (Aren't you glad Powers is in my ear? You won't get this kind of analysis from Scott Hamilton). Lysacek is next up.

Update, 10:51 p.m. Big crowd reaction for favored son Patrick Chan, of course. The Canadian hopeful is the reigning world silver medalist but had a leg injury for much of Grand Prix season.and was a disappointing seventh coming in, He struggled again with his jumps, staggering out of a triple lutz and falling on a triple axel. The fall is an automatic 1-point deduction, plus minus -3 execution marks. No chance for a medal.

Update, 10:30 p.m. A disastrous performance by France's Brian Joubert, a five-time world medalist who won the title in 2007. He fell on his opening quad toe, then staggered out of his triple axel. He was sixth in the Turin Games but probably won't be in the top 15 here.

Update, 9:40 p.m. The authority on all things Olympic, John Powers, reports that Jeremy Abbott, who was 15th after the short program, fell on his quad toe and singled his triple flip (I knew it didn't look good).. If he finishes worse than 12th, it'll be the worst performance by a US champion in Olympic history.

* * *
VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- The order for the top contenders in tonight’s men’s free skate, with their planned program, standing after the short program, and song.

Evan Lysacek and Patrick Chan do not include a quadruple jump, which carries the highest technical score, in their routines. Each skater must complete eight jump elements, three spins and two step sequences.

Patrick Chan, Canada (seventh)
Phantom of the Opera

triple axel/double toe loop
triple flip/triple toe
triple lutz
circular step sequence
flying sit spin
triple axel
triple lutz/double toe/double loop
change foot sit spin
triple loop
triple salchow
double axel
straight line step. seq.
change foot combination spin

Evan Lysacek, US (second)
Sheherazade

triple lutz/triple toe
triple axel
triple salchow
circ. step seq.
flying sit spin
triple axel/double toe
triple loop
triple flip/double toe/double loop
triple lutz
double axel
flying change foot sit spin
straight line step. seq.
change foot comb. spin

Nobunari Oda, Japan (fourth)
Charlie Chaplin medley

quadruple toe
triple axel/triple toe
flying sit spin
triple salchow
circ. step seq.
triple axel
triple lutz/double toe/double loop
triple flip/double toe
triple loop
change foot sit spin
double axel
straight line step seq.
change foot comb. spin

Stephane Lambiel, Switzerland (fifth)
La Traviata

quad toe/double toe/double loop
triple lutz
quad toe
triple flip/triple toe
circ. step sequence
comb. spin
double axel
triple loop
triple flip/double toe
flying sit spin
serpentine step sequence
triple salchow
change foot comb. spin

Daisuke Takahashi, Japan (third)
La Strada

quad toe
triple axel/double toe
triple loop
flying change foot sit spin
circ. step seq.
triple flip/triple toe
triple salchow
triple axel
triple lutz
triple lutz/double toe/double loop
flying change foot. comb. spin
straight line step seq.
change foot comb. spin

Johnny Weir, US (sixth)
Fallen Angel

quad toe
triple axel/triple toe
triple salchow
triple axel
flying sit spin
circ. step sequence
triple loop
triple lutz/double toe/double toe
triple lutz/double toe
double axel
flying change foot sit spin
straight line step seq.
change foot comb. spin

Evgeny Plushenko, Russia
Tango Amore

quad toe/triple toe/double loop
triple axel
triple axel/double toe
triple loop
flying sit spin
triple lutz
change foot sit spin
circ. step. seq.
triple lutz/double toe
triple salchow
double axel
straight line step seq.
change foot comb. spin

Wednesday's results and Thursday's events

Posted by Yoon S. Byun February 18, 2010 01:06 AM

VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- Olympics sports writer John Powers talks about Wednesday's results and gives a preview of Thursday's events.

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