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Destinations

Destinations

Email|Print| Text size + By Jan Shepherd
Globe Correspondent / June 28, 2003

New York

`The American Effect'

July 3-Oct. 12The Whitney Museum of American Art wanted a world's-eye view for the original exhibit "The American Effect." To find art made since 1990 reflecting attitudes about the United States and its status as the lone superpower, curator Lawrence Rinder circled the globe over the last year. He selected 47 artists and filmmakers and three collaborative groups from 30 countries in Europe, Africa, Asia, South and North America, and from Australia, working in a broad spectrum of media. In addition to drawings, paintings, sculpture, installation, and Internet art, the exhibit has a slate of feature-length documentary film and video screenings. Whitney Museum of American Art, 945 Madison Ave. at 75th Street. 212-570-3676.www.whitney.org.Dayton, Ohio

`Inventing Flight'

July 3-20In honor of Orville and Wilbur Wright's first flight 100 years ago in Kitty Hawk, N.C., their hometown soars all year with a variety of Wright-related activities in "Inventing Flight Dayton 2003." The July special events bring together vintage and modern themes. At the new Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park, costumed interpreters re-create the spirit of the Wrights' neighborhood in four sites, among them the brothers' bicycle shop, where they invented the Wright Flyer. Airborne festivities begin at the "Balloon Celebration" with 150 hot-air balloons from around the country scheduled to color the sky in morning and evening ascensions (July 4-6). The annual Vectren Dayton Air Show at the airport is bigger than ever, expanding to four days and featuring precision flying each day by the Air Force Thunderbirds, Navy Blue Angels, and the Canadian Snowbirds, along with a slew of ground displays (July 17-20). International Blimp Meet organizers expect five of the world's 11 blimps to gather at the US Air Force Museum at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (July 11-13). The Dayton Black Cultural Festival honors the Tuskegee Airmen with 47 corps members expected to participate (July 11-13). The final weekend is the National Aviation Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremonies with the homecoming of at least 19 inductees (July 18-19). Among the attractions at Celebration Central, a 12-acre site at Deed's Point near downtown, is Lockheed Martin Exploration Pavilion, where a prototype of the Joint Strike Fighter gets a rare public display. Various locations. 800-221-8234; 888-FLY-2003 (tickets). www.inventingflight.com;daytonairshow.com.Copenhagen

Tivoli Gardens

Through Sept. 21The colorful park of concert halls, outdoor stages, cafes, amusement rides, and beautifully landscaped grounds has been the heart of a Danish summer since 1843 when Georg Carstensen won King Christian VIII's approval to build it. The king believed a merry-go-round would distract the Danes from politics. It still works as escape from the real world. For the 160th anniversary season, the park has added a roller coaster called "The Mine" and introduced a "Flower Parade" honoring the fairy tales of Danish author Hans Christian Andersen. The crowd-pleasing Pantomime Theatre premieres "Harlequin's Triumph," in which ballet and street dance meet. In addition to 100 classical concerts, the park schedules international artists in jazz, pop, and world music. As part of the birthday celebration, the New York City Ballet performs in a weeklong engagement in September. The park reopens for its annual "Christmas in Tivoli" Nov. 18-Dec. 23. Hovedindgang. 011-45-33-15-10-01; 011-45-33-15-10-12 (tickets). www.tivoli.dk.Sleepy Hollow, N.Y.

Kykuit

Through Nov. 2In the past, tours of Kykuit, the Rockefeller Estate, never went upstairs in the 40-room mansion and home of four generations of Rockefellers. That changes this year with the debut of The Grand Tour, a three-hour guided walk that includes the second-floor drawing rooms where Nelson A. Rockefeller, the late vice president and New York governor, and his wife, Happy, worked and had east and west views of their sculpture gardens and the Hudson River landscape. Among their favorite treasures upstairs are four Abstract Expressionist paintings never seen by the public. The rest of the Grand Tour covers the art-filled downstairs, the underground art galleries that house Picasso tapestries (among other works), the Coach Barn, and the gardens and sculpture. The Grand Tour is once a day, except Tuesday. Reservations are recommended. There are two other guided tours: "House and Inner Garden" and "Gardens and Sculpture."Philipsburg Manor/Kykuit Visitor Center, Route 9. 914-631-9491. www.hudsonvalley.org for times, fees.Laguna Beach, Calif.

Sawdust Art Festival

Through Aug. 31Leave it to Southern California to create an outdoor arts festival that lasts all summer and even has a winter edition. It didn't start out that way in 1966, when a group of hippie artists organized a four-week fair in a vacant lot where they put down sawdust to control the dust. Two years later, the artists purchased canyon property with eucalyptus trees dating to the 1800s. Now the festival grounds are open every day, and artists and craftspeople exhibit and sell their creations in booths they build each summer according to local codes. This year there are 195 exhibitors -- painters, photographers, jewelers, potters, glassblowers, sculptors, and printmakers, among others -- and live entertainment. In order to exhibit, artists have to be residents of Laguna Beach, known as an artists' colony since the early 20th century. To keep the spirit of the original, the paths to the artists, stages, demonstration areas, three cafes, a snack bar, and a saloon are covered with sawdust. The winter edition is weekends Nov. 22 through Dec. 14. 935 Laguna Canyon Road. 949-494-3030.www.sawdustartfestival.org. GreatBarrington

Aston Magna Festival

July 5-Aug. 2The nation's oldest annual summer music series using period instruments takes its name from the Great Barrington estate where the ensemble was founded in 1972. After playing at other sites in Great Barrington, the sanctuary of St. James Church in the center of town became the festival's permanent home in the early 1980s. Violinist Daniel Stepner, artistic director since 1991, opens the season with "The Birth of the String Quartet" featuring music of Telemann, Allegri, Scarlatti, Haydn, and early Mozart. Joining him on opening night are David Miller, viola; Loretta O'Sullivan, cello; and Nancy Wilson, violin. The festival's 30th anniversary celebration was postponed last year because it was too soon after 9/11, so the festival closes the season with a gala birthday concert featuring Bach's Brandenburg Concertos Complete. The festival has a second home on Friday evenings at Bard College's Olin Humanities Building auditorium in Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y. Main Street (Route 7) at Taconic Avenue. 413-528-3595, 800-875-7156. www.astonmagna.org.

Destinations is a weekly feature on events and places around the country and the world. Write us at Destinations, Sunday Travel, Boston Globe, PO Box 2378, Boston, MA 02107-2378, or e-mail to travel@globe.com.

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