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Athens makes Pericles proud

The caryatides are projected onto the wall of the New Acropolis Museum, which opened June 20 in the shadow of the Parthenon. The caryatides are projected onto the wall of the New Acropolis Museum, which opened June 20 in the shadow of the Parthenon. (Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images)
July 12, 2009
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ATHENS

New Acropolis Museum: The Acropolis is the most fabled site in the history of Western art. There on June 20, the Greek government opened with great fanfare the New Acropolis Museum. The three-tiered building is located less than 1,000 feet from the Parthenon and offers panoramic views of the Acropolis and the rest of Athens. Its 150,000 square feet of exhibition space display some 350 artifacts and sculptures. That square footage is a tenfold increase over its predecessor, the old Acropolis Museum, built in the 19th century. Designed by Bernard Tschumi and built at a cost of $175 million, the structure is made of glass, concrete, marble, and steel. Its most striking feature is a working archeological evacuation that visitors can see through the first floor. Dionysios Areopagitou Street, 011-30-210-924-1043, www.theacropolismuseum .gr/?pname=Home&la=2.

THROUGH SEPT. 4

HUMLEBAEK, DENMARK

“Green Architecture for the Future’’: Architecture is only partly about where we live and work. It’s also about how we live and work. The Louisiana Museum, Denmark’s foremost venue for modern and contemporary art, has divided this wide-ranging look at sustainable building and design into three sections: “The City,’’ “Climate & Comfort,’’ and “Metabolism.’’ Strandvej 13, 011-45-4919-0719, www.louisi ana.dk.

THROUGH SEPT. 20

LONDON

“Futurism’’: In 1909, a group of Italian artists declared their dedication to “a new beauty, the beauty of speed.’’ They soon became known as Futurists. This comprehensive Tate Modern exhibition observes the group’s centenary, looking not just at Futurism but also such related artistic movements as Cubism and Vorticism. Bankside, 011-44-20 7887-8888, www.tate.org.uk/modern.

THROUGH SEPT. 21

NEW YORK

“James Ensor’’: Next year marks the 150th anniversary of the Belgian painter’s birth. The Museum of Modern Art has mounted an extensive retrospective (it includes some 120 works) honoring this often-overlooked figure whose often grotesque representational canvases make him a key link between late Romantic art and the turbulence of 20th-century Expressionism. 11 West 53d St., 212-708-9400, www.moma.org.

THROUGH OCT. 18

VIENNA

“The Portrait: Photography as a Stage’’: Portraiture has been a central concern of photographers since the medium’s inception. That centrality hasn’t changed over nearly two centuries, but approaches to it certainly have. That’s made plain by this sweeping exhibition at the Vienna Kunsthalle, which examines portraiture of the past three decades. Photographers with work in the show include Robert Mapplethorpe, Nan Goldin, Tina Barney, Thomas Ruff, Sally Mann, and Wolfgang Tillmans. Museumplatz 1, 011-43-1-52189-33, www.kunsthallewien.at.

THROUGH APRIL 11

SEATTLE

“Jimi Hendrix: An Evolution of Sound’’: Has any rock performer made such a profound impression in so short a time? The singer-guitarist was only 27 when he died in 1970. But as this exhibition at the Experience Music Project|Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame makes plain, his legacy thrives. Highlights include the Fender Stratocaster Hendrix played at Woodstock and shards of the one he played (and smashed) at the 1967 Monterey International Pop Festival. 325 5th Ave. North, 877-367-7361, www.empsfm.org.

PLAN AHEAD

SEPT. 17-26

“Phèdre’’: This acclaimed production of Racine’s tragedy stars Helen Mirren in the title role as a queen whose desire for her stepson has disastrous consequences. Nicholas Hytner directs. The translation is by Ted Hughes. Dominic Cooper and Margaret Tyzack also star. Staged by Britain’s National Theatre, the production will be presented by the Shakespeare Theatre Company at Washington, D.C.,’s Harman Center for the Arts. 610 F St. NW, 202-547-1122, www.shakespeare theatre.org/phedre.aspx.

MARK FEENEY

Events are sometimes canceled, rescheduled, or sold out; check online to confirm. Contact Mark Feeney at mfeeney@globe.com.