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In Paris, a thick, good but pricey slice

Posted by guest  February 1, 2010 08:06 AM

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A pair of friends have been telling me about their favorite new pizza place since it opened. Good pizza in Paris is a rare bird, so naturally, my ears perked up.

  Al Taglio is an interesting concept, borrowing heavily from Italy. Walk in, go to the counter, point to one of the big, beautiful rectangles of thick-crust pizza beneath your nose, and they are ready to take a pair of kitchen shears and cut a slice approximately one and a half times as large as the size you indicated, as you will be paying by the kilo. No matter.

 Take a seat on a stool under Smurf-blue lamps and discover that the pizza is fantastic. We shared slices with the anchovy and garlic glory of the Napoli, a decent quattro stagioni, and a beautiful yet mysteriously-named "speck" with uncured (but tasty) ham, mushrooms, and ricotta.

 I was all smiles until a friend burst my bubble. "The only problem with this place," she said, "is the price." I looked up at the menu board, tried to do some calculations and, well, couldn't. How much does a slice of pizza weigh? I have no idea. I do know that some pizzas cost almost 40 euros a kilo, and it made me think of the field day I could have at the cheese shop.

 A form of answer came when the cashier cut a huge square for a take-out order -- just a little more than I could eat in one hungry sitting -- which came out to 30 euros. Solution? Do as we did and go for an appetizer-sized portion -- that and a glass of wine will run you a very reasonable eight euros. Count on anywhere between 8-40 euros.

 Al Taglio
2 Bis Rue Neuve Popincourt‬ 75011 Paris‬
011 33‪ 1 43 38 12 00‬‎

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Globe travel correspondent Joe Ray writes his own blog, Eating The Motherland and contributes to the English language version of Simon Says, the French food and lifestyle blog run by French food critic Francois Simon.


Photo by Joe Ray for The Boston Globe


 


 



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