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Olympics: A clear shot of the cauldron

Posted by Kari Bodnarchuk  February 18, 2010 11:00 AM

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Vancouver cauldron-2.jpg

 

If you’ve tried to get a photo of the Olympic cauldron on Vancouver’s waterfront, but captured little more than the steel fence ringing the impressive icon, give it another shot. Organizers have moved the fence so that people can stand closer to the cauldron, and they’ve added a 90-foot-long, eye-level viewing window. That way, you can get a good shot without needing to climb onto someone’s shoulders or squeeze your lens through the chain-link fence.

 

Better yet, organizers have also opened a free, rooftop viewing area on the neighboring one-story building at 1055 Canada Place. From here, you’ll have a spectacular, unobstructed view of the steel and glass cauldron (symbolizing “fire in ice”), as well as the North Shore Mountains, Stanley Park, and the Olympic rings, which are floating on the water.

 

Show up at the rooftop deck between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. until the close of the Games on February 28 to see the cauldron while it’s still lit. It will be reignited for the Paralympic Winter Games, which begin on March 12.

 

Photo by Kari Bodnarchuk for The Boston Globe

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