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Book a 'haunting' stay this Halloween season

Posted by Eric Wilbur, Boston.com Staff  September 30, 2013 02:13 PM

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By Alexa Dibenedetto, Boston.com Correspondent

With October right around the corner, New Englanders prepare for an onslaught of Fall festivities: cider-making, pumpkin picking, etc. And with Halloween just weeks away, those who enjoy a good spook are sure to be excited. If ghost stories and scary movie marathons just aren’t enough, consider spending the night in a haunted hotel. Historic Hotels of America has created some haunted hotel packages for brave travelers, complete with ghost tours and other ghoulish specials.

Skeptic or believer, everyone is welcome. The question is: Are you up for it?

Here are just a few of the hotels on the list:

1. La Fonda on the Plaza in Santa Fe, New Mexico

La Fonda’s paranormal tales stem from Old West brawls and shootouts. The hotel is rumored to be haunted by the Honorable John P. Slough, chief justice of the Territorial Supreme Court, who was shot to death in 1867 in the hotel lobby. Guests also report sightings of a distraught salesman who committed suicide after losing his company’s money at the hotel’s gambling hall.

2. Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC

The wife of railroad tycoon Joseph Stickney, who built the Omni Shoreham Hotel in 1902, is still considered an inhabitant of the resort. Caroline Foster, nicknamed “The Princess” by the hotel’s staff, is often spotted roaming the halls in elegant Victorian attire. She is also said to haunt room 314, where guests report seeing her at the edge of their guest bed - the same custom made four-post bed Caroline shared with her husband.

3. The Sagamore in Bolton Landing, New York

Legend has it that a maid was murdered here at the hands of one guest’s enraged wife, who believed the woman had slept with her husband. It’s said that the maid continues to haunt the hotel room; guests complain that the room gets very cold and sometimes ask to be moved because they can’t get the room warm enough. There are also reports of blankets being removed in the middle of the night.

4. Lord Baltimore Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland

Fran Carter, the supervisor of the hotel, tells a frightful tale of her ghost-spotting experience. In 1998, she was on working on the nineteenth floor, sitting at a desk with a doorway at her left. Carter reports seeing a little girl in a long, cream-colored dress run by the open doorway, bouncing a red ball before her. She pursued the girl, calling out, “Little girl, are you lost?” only to find that the hallway was completely empty.

5. 1886 Crescent Hotel and Spa in Eureka Springs, Arkansas

At one point in its history, the hotel acted as an experimental cancer hospital. A man named Norman Baker, who (falsely) claimed to be a licensed physician, charged patients exorbitant amounts of money to be examined in the hotel’s basement. Baker and his guests reportedly continue to roam the hotel. Even creepier is the ghost of a nurse pushing a gurney in Dr. Baker's old morgue area which still contains his autopsy table and walk-in freezer.

6. The Jekyll Island Club Hotel in Jekyll Island, Georgia

In addition to its staff of bellmen, the hotel is home to one bellman that is less contemporary. Dressed in pre-WWI attire, the bellman is very particular about delivering freshly pressed suits to bridegrooms. More than one bridegroom has reported hearing him knock gently on their guest room door and announcing his purpose.

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