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Skiing with trying teens

teen1.jpgWhen our kids were little we gave them choices – colored pencils or crayons, for example. 

But skiing was not a choice, it was what our family did on winter weekends. However, i a blink, our tagalong toddlers have grown into teens with 'tudes. I hear, "I want to sleep in this weekend" or "there's a party that all my friends are going to" instead of the delight of driving to our favorite downhill resort.

My brother-in-law, Stuart, expressed a similar vex, and said he could have broken the blood pressure gauge when his 16-year-old son chose sleep over a foot of powder at Wildcat one weekend. What's a powder-loving parent to do? Drag them along with their down-turned faces, witnessing the resentful Facebook posts all weekend? Or cave into the cave-dwelling mentality of moody teens, skipping a weekend of snow fun so the kids can be seen at the school dance?

I can tell you we have done both, we have brought the kids begrudgingly and had them sour on an otherwise sweet ski trip. And we have stayed home, with my husband and I doing mundane chores all weekend, when we are the grumpy ones, looking out the window with lust, leering at our sleep-until-noon-but-socialites-at-night-teens.

My advice: Don't be hostage to your home or your teen. Ski season in New England is too short to say "shoulda, woulda, coulda." I suggest looking into slopeside lodging. You can lure your teen with the offer that they can lounge in the morning while you do laps on the chair (getting the good snow). Or arrange supervised sleepovers with your teen's BFF, then just go. You can reciprocate with the providing parents come spring (when the snow is gone).

Besides, the thought of a ski weekend with my BFF (my husband) is exciting, no kids, no complaints. And I am hoping the "take away" will work, and the teens will want to tag along next ski trip.

More ski stories by Heather: www.familyskitrips.com

Photo by Greg Burke 

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