Adams National Historical Park in Quincy. The Adamses moved into the house in Adams park pictured here, the Old House at Peacefield, in 1788
Adams National Historical Park in Quincy.
Globe Photo

Summer is a great time to pack up the car and explore New England. Last summer, 79 percent of all leisure trips were by car, according to WalletHub. The question is, where should you go? Our area of the country is packed with beautiful beaches and mountains and attractions, making it hard to decide. According to WalletHub’s list of best and worst states for summer road trips, you’d do best to stay right in Massachusetts.

Massachusetts ranked the best of the New England states when it came to summer road trips, landing at No. 12 of all U.S. states. Wondering how the other New England states fared? New Hampshire is next at No. 19, then Rhode Island at No. 27, Maine at No. 31, Vermont at No. 34, and, finally, Connecticut at No. 44 (sorry, Connecticut!).

The rankings are based on driving and accommodation costs, traffic conditions and safety, weather conditions, and fun or scenic attractions. WalletHub pulled data from a variety of national and state travel sites.

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In addition to road trip rankings, the states were also scored in a variety of subcategories including overall gas prices, camping costs, and number of scenic spots. Massachusetts ranked No. 1 for the most national park units per square mile. There are 15 national parks scattered throughout the state, including the John F. Kennedy National Historic Site and the Adams National Historical Park. Visitors can also enjoy one of the five national heritage areas, 11 national natural landmarks, and 186 national historic landmarks in Massachusetts, according to the National Park Service.

So which states beat us out? Oregon, at No. 1, is king of the summer road trips, and Idaho, Minnesota, Utah, and Washington round out the top five. On the flipside, Alaska, Arkansas, West Virginia, Oklahoma, and Mississippi ranked last (we’re really sorry, Mississippi).

Where will you go on your next road trip?