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Hubble astronauts, scientists to meet at MIT for repair mission 20th anniversary event

Posted by Matt Rocheleau  November 5, 2013 01:25 PM

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The following is an announcement from MIT:

The astronaut crew of the first rescue mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope, mission STS-61, will gather at MIT’s Bartos Theater on Wed., Nov. 13, from 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. The astronauts, joined by scientists and other space experts involved with the mission, will discuss the mission’s challenges, and its importance to space history (including making the International Space Station possible) and the future of space exploration. “Rescuing Hubble,” commemorates the 20th anniversary of the December 1993 rescue mission. The event is sponsored by the MIT Aeronautics and Astronautics Department and is open to the public.

What: “Rescuing Hubble,” symposium on STS-61, the 1993 mission to repair the space telescope. Open to the public
Why: 20th anniversary of the mission
When: November 13, 2013, 9:30am – 6pm
Where: MIT Bartos Theater, Building E15, Room 070, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge, MA
Program highlights:
• 11:30 a.m.: Planning and training for the rescue mission
• 3:30 p.m.: 20th anniversary post-flight briefing with the STS-61 crew
• 4:30 p.m.: Servicing the Hubble Space Telescope after STS-61
• 6:30 p.m.: The future of space servicing
• Complete agenda http://aeroastro.mit.edu/news-events/rescuing-hubble
Who:
• STS-61 Space Shuttle Endeavor astronaut crewmembers MIT AeroAstro Professor Jeff Hoffman (EVA) (symposium co-chairman), Story Musgrave (payload commander, EVA), Dick Covey (mission commander), Ken Bowersox (pilot),Tom Akers (EVA).
• Robert Williams, Space Telescope Institute former director
• Frank Cepollina, Space Servicing Capabilities manager
• James Crocker, Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement designer
• John Trauger, Wide Field and Planetary Camera correction designer
• Joseph Rothenberg, former NASA associate administrator for space flight
• Ronald Sheffield, Lockheed Hubble Space Telescope crew training manager
• Kathy Flanagan, Space Telescope Science Institute deputy director
• John Logsdon, George Washington Space Policy Institute former director
• Milton Heflin, STS-61 lead flight director
• David Mindell, MIT AeroAstro, and Program in Science, Technology, and Society Professor (symposium co-chairman)

Additional Background

The Hubble Space Telescope was deployed in April 1990 to explore and answer some of astronomy’s most intriguing questions, including those of the origin and evolution of the universe. Within weeks of attaining orbit a stunning realization emerged: a manufacturing defect resulted in images of such poor quality that the project was in danger of failure, and future projects, including the International Space Station, were in doubt.

The landmark December 2-13, 1993 rescue mission, STS-61, was the most complex and challenging Space Shuttle mission that had ever been flown. Through an unprecedented five space walks, the mission reversed Hubble’s fate and opened the door to unprecedented future space projects including the International Space Station.

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