boston.com Your Life your connection to The Boston Globe
White Coat Notes: News from the Boston-area medical community
Comments
Send your comments and tips to whitecoat@globe.com
Categories


Blogger
Elizabeth Cooney is a health reporter for the Worcester Telegram & Gazette.
Contributors
Boston Globe Health and Science staff:
Scott Allen
Alice Dembner
Carey Goldberg
Liz Kowalczyk
Stephen Smith
Colin Nickerson
Beth Daley
Karen Weintraub, Deputy Health and Science Editor, and Gideon Gil, Health and Science Editor.
 Short White Coat blogger Ishani Ganguli
 Short White Coat blogger Jennifer Srygley
Week of: November 11
Week of: November 4
Week of: October 28
Week of: October 21
Week of: October 14
Week of: October 7

« In case you missed it: veterans in rural areas, mosquitoes and climate change | Main | University of Miami luring top researchers »

Monday, April 30, 2007

Today's Globe: genetics of life on Mars, undersea life, lessons out of med school, chocolate dream, Botox, full moon, Joslin halt

If there is life on Mars, a Harvard geneticist Gary Ruvkun thinks it resembles something we already know. Now, he's trying to prove it.

Laura Preston, a ninth-grade earth sciences teacher at Salem High School in New Hampshire, shares her blog about spending the last four weeks aboard a research vessel in the Pacific Ocean studying undersea volcanoes.

Some situations are not rehearsed in medical school, where we focused on the details of diseases, not on what to advise families struggling with problems like childhood obesity, parental smoking, overdose, television abuse, Internet pornography, and anxiety, writes Dr. Victoria Rogers McEvoy, chief of pediatrics and the medical director of the Mass. General West Medical Group and assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School.

Also in Health/Science, meet Dr. Norman Hollenberg, who is raising hopes that the secret elixir of life may have less to do with wheat germ and more with cocoa. And does Botox help with migraines and do people behave oddly when the when the moon is full?

In Business, just four months into his job as head of the Joslin Diabetes Center, Ranch Kimball has pulled the plug on the center's ambitious plan to build a new laboratory building and 29-story residential tower at its Longwood home.

Posted by Elizabeth Cooney at 06:25 AM
Sponsored Links