boston.com Your Life your connection to The Boston Globe
White Coat Notes: News from the Boston-area medical community
Comments
Send your comments and tips to whitecoat@globe.com
Categories


Blogger
Elizabeth Cooney is a health reporter for the Worcester Telegram & Gazette.
Contributors
Boston Globe Health and Science staff:
Scott Allen
Alice Dembner
Carey Goldberg
Liz Kowalczyk
Stephen Smith
Colin Nickerson
Beth Daley
Karen Weintraub, Deputy Health and Science Editor, and Gideon Gil, Health and Science Editor.
 Short White Coat blogger Ishani Ganguli
 Short White Coat blogger Jennifer Srygley
Week of: November 11
Week of: November 4
Week of: October 28
Week of: October 21
Week of: October 14
Week of: October 7

« UMass Medical School recruits two RNA stars | Main | This week in the New England Journal of Medicine »

Wednesday, September 5, 2007

Health officials to consider revising retail clinic rules

By Felicia Mello, Globe Correspondent

State health officials said they would consider revising proposed rules to allow the opening of medical clinics in retail stores in response to concerns raised by doctors groups at a public hearing today.

Physicians testified that the regulations did not do enough to prevent infections at the clinics or to ensure that patients receive consistent medical treatment from providers who know their histories. Pediatricians said the clinics should not be allowed to treat children under 2 years old, to avoid confusion with immunization records.

The state Department of Public Health developed the rules after the pharmacy chain CVS asked for permission to open up to 30 "MinuteClinics" in the Boston area. Nurse practitioners in the clinics would provide rapid care for minor ailments such as bladder infections and poison ivy.

Regulators also heard from nurse practitioners and a patient who supported the clinics.

"We received a good deal of thoughtful testimony both in favor and in opposition to the regulations, and those that were opposed made very helpful suggestions on how to make the regulations better," Paul Dreyer, director of the department's Bureau of Quality Assurance and Control, said after the hearing. He said department staff would look at setting a minimum age for clinic patients and requiring clinics to answer after-hours phone calls.

The state Public Health Council could vote on the rules as early as November.

Sponsored Links