boston.com Your Life your connection to The Boston Globe
White Coat Notes: News from the Boston-area medical community
Comments
Send your comments and tips to whitecoat@globe.com
Categories


Blogger
Elizabeth Cooney is a health reporter for the Worcester Telegram & Gazette.
Contributors
Boston Globe Health and Science staff:
Scott Allen
Alice Dembner
Carey Goldberg
Liz Kowalczyk
Stephen Smith
Colin Nickerson
Beth Daley
Karen Weintraub, Deputy Health and Science Editor, and Gideon Gil, Health and Science Editor.
 Short White Coat blogger Ishani Ganguli
 Short White Coat blogger Jennifer Srygley
Week of: November 11
Week of: November 4
Week of: October 28
Week of: October 21
Week of: October 14
Week of: October 7

« This week in the New England Journal of Medicine | Main | Advocate joining state Department of Public Health »

Thursday, September 6, 2007

Today's Globe: organ replacement and drug discovery funds, black women's tumors, popcorn risk

Boston researchers are about to begin a bold experiment that, if it works, could help solve the organ shortage and provide other replacement parts for worn-out humans. A second local group hopes to transform the drug discovery process. The National Institutes of Health plans to announce today that it will fund both of these projects as part of a $483 million initiative to support daring, difficult research.

A new study gives a possible explanation for why breast cancer is deadlier in black women: They are more likely to have tumors that do not respond to the hormone-based treatments that help many others with the disease.

popcorn%20shelf150%202.bmpFour of the biggest makers of microwave popcorn are working to remove a flavoring chemical from their products that's linked to a lung ailment in popcorn plant workers while reassuring consumers about the snack's safety. Microwave popcorn fans worried about the potential for lung disease from butter flavoring fumes should know this: The sole reported case of the disease in a nonfactory worker involves a man who popped the corn every day and inhaled from the bag.

Lahey Clinic is working to land a new helipad on its Burlington campus, so helicopters carrying trauma patients will no longer have to land at TRW Park, a ball field and playground a half-mile from the hospital.

Posted by Elizabeth Cooney at 06:43 AM
Sponsored Links