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Elizabeth Cooney is a health reporter for the Worcester Telegram & Gazette.
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« 'Brain-eating amoeba' unlikely here, experts say | Main | UMass participating in long-term study of child health »

Thursday, October 4, 2007

Today's Globe: children's health bill veto, surgeon in VA probe, virtual colonoscopy, drug-coated stents

SCHIP%20300.bmp
The bill that President Bush vetoed would have
expanded the State Children's Health Insurance
program by $35 billion. Above, Christina
Brownlee got a checkup in Miami yesterday.
(Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

President Bush yesterday vetoed a bill to add $35 billion to a program providing health insurance coverage to children from lower-income families, portraying the State Children's Health Insurance Program as a costly entitlement program that has increasingly come to benefit middle-class families.

A surgeon with a history of malpractice complaints in Massachusetts was involved in "aggressive, complex surgeries" at a Veterans Affairs medical center in southern Illinois that went beyond what that site could handle, resulting in a spike in deaths there, US Senator Richard Durbin said yesterday.

Having an X-ray to look for signs of colon cancer may soon be an option for those who dread the traditional scope exam.

Patients given drug-coated stents to prop open clogged heart arteries were less likely to die or need repeat procedures than those with older, bare-metal devices, according to a study that may help revive sales of the newer models.

Posted by Elizabeth Cooney at 06:55 AM
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