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Collective splendors, near and far

“Harry Callahan at 100’’ features many portraits of the photographer’s wife, Eleanor. “Harry Callahan at 100’’ features many portraits of the photographer’s wife, Eleanor. (PACE/MACGILL GALLERY)
By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff / October 30, 2011

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THROUGH MARCH 4

WASHINGTON

“Harry Callahan at 100’’: This year marks the centenary of the photographer’s birth. To observe the occasion, the National Gallery of Art has mounted this major retrospective of his work. The exhibition, which includes some 100 Callahan photographs, follows the progression of his career. From early days in Detroit, it moves on to Callahan’s 1940s and ’50s work in Chicago to the ’60s and ’70s in Providence (where Callahan taught at the Rhode Island School of Design) and on until his death in 1999. A highlight of the show is Callahan’s many portraits of his wife, Eleanor. As an ongoing visual love letter, it has few rivals in 20th-century art. 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW, 202-737-4215, www.nga.gov

THROUGH JAN. 8

FRANKFURT

“Beckmann & America’’: This Stadel Museum exhibition looks at the final three years of Max Beckmann’s life, which he spent in St. Louis and New York. The painter had long wanted to come to the United States, and his arrival inspired a highly productive - and uncharacteristically sunny - final stage in his career. The show comprises 110 works, including paintings, drawings, watercolors, prints, and sculptures. Durerstrasse 2, 011-49-69-6050-980, www.staedelmuseum.de

THROUGH APRIL 18

HOUSTON

“Tutankhamun: The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs’’: This Houston Museum of Fine Arts show offers more than 100 objects, few of which have been exhibited in the United States. More than half come from the tomb of King Tut. Among the items in the exhibition is a 10-foot-high statue of the Egyptian ruler, the largest surviving likeness of the pharoah. 1001 Bissonnet, 713-639-7300, mfah.org

NOV. 7-FEB. 5

LONDON

“Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan’’: One of the treasures of the National Gallery collection is Leonardo’s “Virgin of the Rocks.’’ With the painting’s recent restoration as inspiration, this exhibition focuses on Leonardo’s work from the late 1480s and ’90s. Several notable international loans augment the show’s roster of paintings and drawings by Leonardo and his contemporaries. Trafalgar Square, 011-44-20-7747-2885, www.nationalgallery.org.uk

NOV. 8-JAN. 29

PARIS

“Samurai Armor from the Ann and Gabriel Barbier-Mueller Museum’’: This Musee du Quai Branly exhibition shows the evolution of Japan’s famous warrior class from the 12th to the 19th centuries. More than 140 objects are on display. Combining both great beauty and utility, they include suits of armor (equine and human), saddles, helmets, archery equipment, and, of course, swords. 37, quai Branly, 011-33-56-61-70-00, www.quaibranly.fr/en

NOV. 8-MARCH 25

MADRID

“The Hermitage in the Prado’’: The title is self-explanatory. Saint Petersburg shares its splendors with Madrid, as two of the world’s great museums join forces. In addition to archeological treasures dating to the fifth century BC, the exhibition boasts paintings by Titian, Velázquez, Rembrandt, Cézanne, Matisse, and Picasso; sculptures by Bernini and Canova; drawings by Dürer, Rubens, and Ingres. Calle Ruiz de Alarcón, 011-34-91-330-2800, www.museodelprado.es/en

PLAN AHEAD

FEB. 9-APRIL 29

SEATTLE

“Gauguin and Polynesia: An Elusive Paradise’’: The Seattle Art Museum is the sole US venue for this exhibition. It takes Paul Gauguin’s fabled sojourn in Tahiti and looks at it in a larger context of Polynesian culture, juxtaposing 50 of his paintings, sculptures, and works on paper with a comparable number of sculptures by indigenous artists. 1300 First Ave., 206-654-3100, www.seattleartmuseum.org

MARK FEENEY

Events are sometimes canceled, rescheduled, or sold out; check online. Mark Feeney can be reached at mfeeney@globe.com.


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