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STAR WATCH

Cassiopeia constellation commands spotlight in fall, winter

By Alan M. MacRobert
Globe Correspondent / December 3, 2011
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What’s the best-known star pattern, especially for people who rarely look at the stars? Orion would qualify. It’s the brightest winter constellation, and you can already spot it climbing up the southeastern sky by 8 or 9 p.m. The three-star line of Orion’s Belt in its middle is now almost vertical. Then there’s the Big Dipper, but it’s currently lying down along the north horizon, where buildings or trees probably block your view. Next on the list would have to be Cassiopeia.

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