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Brighton couple's cat, 'Sully,' undergoes surgery to remove hidden stick lodged near heart

Posted by Matt Rocheleau  July 12, 2012 07:20 AM

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Sully Examined Post Surgery 3.JPG

(Angell Animal Medical Center)

"Sully," a two-year-old cat, takes a close look at a Tweety Bird blanket during recovery at a Boston veterinarian facility. The cat underwent surgery to remove a stick lodged near several of his vital organs.

“Sully,” a Brighton couple’s 2-year-old cat, is back at home after undergoing emergency surgery this week to remove a four-inch stick that was lodged perilously close to the feline’s heart and embedded so deeply it was nearly invisible.

Veterinarians at the MSPCA Angell Animal Medical Center in Jamaica Plain were able to locate the stick on Sunday after cleaning away some of the fur on the Maine Coon rescue cat’s belly, discovering an entry wound and performing X-rays that showed the sharp object had narrowly missed puncturing several vital organs.

Veterinarian Sarah Cannizzo, who found the stick, said the cat “appeared to be in significant pain.” Her colleagues, surgeon Nicholas Trout and anesthesiologist Jeff Wilson, performed the surgery to remove the stick.

After recovering from the procedure, Sully is back home with his owners Jaimie Sevene and her boyfriend Derek. The couple brought Sully to the veterinarian facility’s emergency department after noticing that “Sully” seemed lethargic.

How the stick wound up inside the cat remains a mystery. The cat owners’ say they keep Sully indoors at all times, which animal medical center staff said they recommend, but they believe he may have escaped to the basement of their Brighton home, where there are scraps of wood.

“After this scare I realize just how crafty Sully can be and we have already established new household ‘rules’ to ensure he never again finds himself in the basement,” Sevene said.

For information about Angell Animal Medical Center’s emergency and critical care Services, click here.

E-mail Matt Rocheleau at mjrochele@gmail.com.
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Sully x-ray image.png

(Angell Animal Medical Center)

The X-ray that showed the stick inside of "Sully."

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