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Man greeted by pregnant wife after Boston Marathon explosion

Posted by Your Town  April 15, 2013 05:49 PM

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Jeff Martin being greeted by his mother and pregnant wife at the Public Garden. "I crossed the finish, was pretty elated to have done that," Martin said. "And then about 100 yards past the finish line [I] heard the first explosion, turned around saw all the smoke and then instantly my thoughts turned to the fact that my family and pregnant wife who were supposed to be standing there waiting for me. Photo by Adam Sennott

Confused and panicked runners gathered at the Boston public garden after two explosions went off during the Boston Marathon this afternoon.

While many of them had already finished the race, they went to the Garden looking for relatives, personal belongings, or trying to find a way home.

Jeff Martin finished the race in just under four hours.

He said he spent two hours looking for his pregnant wife and his mother after crossing the finish line. They were supposed to be waiting for him at the end.

But then, explosions went off.

"I crossed the finish, was pretty elated to have done that," Martin said. "And then, about 100 yards past the finish line, [I] heard the first explosion, turned around, saw all the smoke and then instantly my thoughts turned to the fact that my family and pregnant wife were supposed to be standing there waiting for me."

Libby Campanella, a student athletic trainer for the University of South Carolina, said she was assigned Zone 1—an area located feet away from the finish line.

“Then all of a sudden we heard a big explosion and saw a lot of smoke,” Campanella said. “Then we heard the second one and everyone turned around and just started running, trying to get out of there.”

Campanella said she was at the Public Garden because she was responsible for one of the wheelchair runner’s chair and couldn’t get her ID back until the wheelchair was returned.

“Half of these runners couldn’t even walk.” She said.

Chris Fulchino, of Newton, said he was at the Arlington T stop when services were shut down. He was looking for a way to get home.

He said it would probably take longer to get home than the three hours it took him to complete the race.

This article is being published under an arrangement between the Boston Globe and Emerson College.

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