THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
< Back to front page Text size +

Beverly's Landmark School receives technology grant

Posted by Amanda Stonely  October 28, 2011 10:00 AM

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

Landmark_InvenTeam_2011.JPGLandmark School's InvenTeam.

The following was submitted by Landmark School:

BEVERLY, MA — Landmark School was recently awarded a Lemelson-MIT InvenTeam grant in the amount of $8,000 to create a desalination drip irrigation system to be used in developing countries with minimal rainfall. Landmark School is one of 16 teams nationwide to be selected as an InvenTeam this year.

InvenTeams are teams of high school students, teachers, and mentors that receive grants up to $10,000 each to invent technological solutions to real-world problems. Entering its ninth year, this initiative of the Lemelson-MIT Program aims to inspire a new generation of inventors.

“The InvenTeams program represents the future,” said Leigh Estabrooks, Invention Education Officer from the Lemelson-MIT Program. “We place an emphasis on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)-focused projects to develop interest in these fields among youth. With InvenTeams, our primary goal is to foster high school students’ passion for invention and innovation, in turn inspiring them to consider careers in science, technology, engineering, or math.”

Landmark faculty members Carl Gasowski and Doug Walker initiated the InvenTeam application process last spring and attended training at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in June to help prepare the final proposal. A prestigious panel of judges composed of educators, researchers, staff, and alumni from MIT as well as representatives from the industry and former Lemelson-MIT Award winners assembled this fall and selected Landmark School as one of this year’s InvenTeam grant recipients.

Landmark’s desalination system is projected to be site built by individuals or villages in emergent nations, particularly in areas of minimal annual rainfall. The unit may also be used as a water purification system for potable water. The intent of this design is to allow individuals to build units using local, recycled parts. Landmark plans to test the system at sites in Jamaica, Malawi, and Zimbabwe.

Over the next nine months, Landmark School’s InvenTeam will develop its desalination drip irrigation system. In June the students will showcase a prototype of their invention at EurekaFest at MIT in Cambridge, Mass. EurekaFest, presented by the Lemelson-MIT Program, is a multi-day celebration designed to empower a legacy of inventors through activities that inspire youth, honor role models, and encourage creativity and problem solving.

ABOUT THE LEMELSON-MIT PROGRAM Celebrating innovation, inspiring youth.
The Lemelson-MIT Program celebrates outstanding innovators and inspires young people to pursue creative lives and careers through invention. Jerome H. Lemelson, one of U.S. history’s most prolific inventors, and his wife Dorothy founded the Lemelson-MIT Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1994. It is funded by The Lemelson Foundation and administered by the School of Engineering. The Foundation sparks, sustains, and celebrates innovation and the inventive spirit. It supports projects in the U.S. and developing countries that nurture innovators and unleash invention to advance economic, social, and environmentally sustainable development. To date The Lemelson Foundation has donated or committed more than U.S. $150 million in support of its mission. http://web.mit.edu/invent/

ABOUT LANDMARK SCHOOL
Landmark School is an independent, coeducational boarding and day school with elementary, middle, and college preparatory high school programs. It caters to students, grades 2 – 12, with language-based learning disabilities, such as dyslexia. Students possess average to above average intelligence and normal behavioral development. 92% of Landmark Seniors attend four and two year colleges after they graduate, 23% higher than the national average. In an effort to influence many more students than can attend Landmark School, the Outreach program’s mission includes extensive professional development courses, workshops, and publications for educators, administrators, clinicians, and parents designed to reach some of the estimated 3 - 5 million students nationwide who suffer from learning disabilities. Visit us on the web at www.landmarkschool.org

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article