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Landmark School in Beverly to launch Reach in September

Posted by Ryan Mooney  May 11, 2012 11:48 AM

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The Landmark School in Beverly, in conjunction with Endicott College, will launch a revolutionary college preparation program this September.

The Reach Program, directed by Suzanne Crossman, is aimed at helping recently graduated seniors or struggling early college students, but is open to anyone with a high school diploma.

"The program is really designed to work with students who have the ability to handle college-level content that are lacking some of the skills," Crossman said. "And really it's an intensive year to work on that skill development."

Students enrolled in the program take classes at Landmark with teachers who help them to develop organizational, studying, writing, and general college readiness skills while taking real college courses at Endicott. Students can earn from six to nine credits at Endicott, which are transferable.

"Students are taking classes at Endicott to give them practice with that real-life college experience while they still have us there in the Reach program to support them and the application of all the skills we're teaching to their college classes," Crossman said.

The Reach Program is similar to a college preparation program that Landmark ran in the past, which grew so large that it spawned the current Landmark College in Putney, Vt.

According to Crossman, statistics revealing high college dropout rates in the United States prompted Landmark to pursue the program. A grant from the Ted and Roberta Mann Foundation funded the program.

The Landmark School is an independent, coeducational boarding and day school that primarily enrolls students in grades 2 - 12 with language-based learning disabilities.

"We're very excited about it," said Landmark Headmaster and President Robert Broudo. "There's so many young people who get out of high school ... they may have an undiagnosed language-based learning disability. They are bright enough to get into college but they just don't have the skill sets. So you see a lot of kids start college and stop because they're so overwhelmed...we think that we can put those pieces together so that they can go out and have a very successful college experience."

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