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Crane Estate art show features local and student artists

Posted by boston.com  November 4, 2013 10:55 AM

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Evan Sullivan displaying his work.


By Angie Sykeny, Gordon College News Service

When Montserrat College of Art junior Evan Sullivan began creating his series of art prints about re-urbanization, he was doing it for a class assignment, not an art show. Now, at the suggestion of his printmaking professor Len Thomas-Vickory, Sullivan will have one of his silk screen prints from the series on display at the 10th Annual Crane Estate Art Show and Sale Nov. 9 and 10 in Ipswich.
 
“The assignment was to make a poster that promotes something,’” said Sullivan. His series of posters contains several variations of a four-color traffic jam with suburban homes and a city center with walking pedestrians.
 
“We created the suburbs with the best intentions but we are actually destroying the nature around us to build them,” he said. “Reurbanization is about bringing people back to the cities, but also to change the cities, make them more walkable and eco-friendly to preserve the natural landscape around us.”
 
Sullivan’s pieces reflect the greater theme of this year’s show, hosted by the Trustees of Reservations, “Shifting Perspectives.” All of the art highlights some aspect of North Shore landmarks and landscapes, and sales will benefit both the Trustees and the artists.  The show is free to attend and will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days at Castle Hill on the Crane Estate.
 
According to Thomas-Vickory, Sullivan is one of 40-50 Montserrat students submitting paintings, drawings, printmaking, and photography pieces for the event. It is the College’s fourth year having work in the show, but many local high schools also have students participating, including Beverly, Danvers, Ipswich, and Peabody. According to Trina Schell, public programs and volunteer manager of the Trustees, there will be nearly 150 pieces of student art featured in the Casino Complex.
 
The show is an opportunity not only for students, but for other local artists as well. In the Great House there will be over 150 pieces by 69 different local artists, and in the outside space between the Great House and the Casino Complex, there will be sculptures by six different sculptors.  
 
“We have some of the top artists on the North Shore,” said Schell. “The quality of the art is just fabulous.”
 
Local artist Sandra Belock-Phippen of Wenham has regularly had her work in the show, and almost every year it has sold. She said her inspiration comes predominantly from the salt marshes in the area.
 
“I hope my work rings true with viewers,” she said. “That they come away with the sense of color, beauty and drama I find in nature.” 
 
In addition to two large pieces, Belock Phippen will also submit a few pieces for the “small works gallery.” Schell said this gallery of 8x8 or small pieces appeals to the more casual buyer who doesn’t have the money or the wall space for a big-framed piece, but can still find space for “that perfect little find.”
 
But the show has more than just open galleries. From a giant chalkboard where they can contribute their own flair to a game of “art eye spy,” visitors are encouraged to be interactive and have fun. They will even have the opportunity to vote for their favorite piece to win the People’s Choice Award. The work with the most votes will be featured in the publicity material for next year’s show.
 
But for Sullivan, art isn’t about the money or the publicity—it’s about the process.
 
“I do it because I enjoy it,” he said, “but I create it for other people to see. I’ve never had the intention of selling my art, but if someone wanted to buy it, I would be honored to share it with them.” 

This article is being published under an arrangement between the Boston Globe and the Gordon College News Service

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