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Braintree and Weymouth to continue teamwork on trash

Posted by Jessica Bartlett  March 21, 2013 10:53 AM

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Braintree officials announced that the town will continue working with Weymouth on a trash pick-up plan, following Quincy's decision to go on its own.

Braintree and Weymouth have not settled on a new contract, and will issue a Request for Qualifications to see what kind of opportunities are available to save money. But regardless of what is to come, officials from both communities said they are committed to regionalization.

“The negotiating power of volume, the synergies within the programs of our two communities and past success in our programs encourages me to fully investigate what new options are available to stabilize costs and move toward better service programs to reduce our trash output and increase our recycling through new efforts – especially those that hold the line on cost while benefiting the environment in the long-run,” said Braintree Mayor Joseph Sullivan in a release.

Quincy recently decided to back out of the agreement among the three towns after finding a trash contract that would save the city even more money.

The change hasn’t shifted the resolve of the other South Shore partners to work together, and so Braintree and Weymouth will look to save money in a new agreement with an outside vendor.

“Expiring contracts gives pause to making sure new opportunities and technologies are fully and fairly investigated before we proceed,” said Weymouth Mayor Sue Kay.

Both communities have Capitol Waste handling their services for both trash and recycling, but they hope to review alternatives that would take effect on July 1.

The possibilities are extensive, and include increased recycling capabilities in Weymouth by moving to weekly collection – as Braintree currently has.

Officials are also looking into a standardized collection system for recycling, which would use vendor-supplied, wheeled carts. The system would allow for automated collection, in other words, increased recycling.

“There are some very successful models being instituted, and we will be looking for the ‘best practices’ and building a program that works for our communities within the next several months,” Sullivan said.

Though the mayors are looking at new methods of transportation, any effort would use the newly upgraded Covanta transfer station facility on Ivory Street in Braintree to dispose of the trash.

Unveiled in mid-January, the upgrade includes a new sound barrier wall, noise-reducing enclosures, and an air-filtration system to mitigate odors.

The station also has a new resident drop-off area and landscaping around the facility to hide the plant from neighbors.

Trash is trucked to the space before being shipped to the Covanta SEMASS Energy-from-Waste facility in Rochester, where trash is combusted to generate electricity.

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