THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
< Back to front page Text size +

Mosquito spraying to begin in Braintree on Thursday

Posted by Jessica Bartlett  May 28, 2013 04:50 PM

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

Mosquito spraying will begin Thursday for Braintree residents in an effort to cut down on the pesky, disease-carrying bugs before summer kicks into high gear.

Truck spraying will happen every Thursday in town from May 30 through September 26, and will focus on areas where residents have contacted the Norfolk County Mosquito Control District office with complaints about mosquitoes.

The spraying start after dark, and locations will differ week to week.

“Our applications are designed twofold,” said Norfolk County Mosquito Control District Director David Lawson. “They will kill nuisance mosquitoes. People who are bothered by them, it will cut down on the numbers. More so, as the season goes on, it’s also effective at controlling disease … We believe and the science indicates that these applications are effective at reducing mosquitoes and reducing the spread of disease.”

As West Nile virus and EEE start to surface later in the season, sprayings will occur where testing sites have shown disease-carrying mosquitoes.

Residents can find out where the County is going to be spraying by visiting their website http://www.norfolkcountymosquito.org or by calling 617-582-6216 after 3:30 P.M. the day of the scheduled treatment.

Though locals should be aware of the sprayings, their life shouldn’t be hampered by it, Lawson said.

“Our drivers are trained. If they see people out jogging in a yard where they are spraying, they will turn off. And people aren’t going to know exactly when we will be out in their area, we can only give them a general time frame,” he said.

Because the spraying happens after dark, the hope is that people will have gone inside by then, Lawson said.

Residents can also opt out of receiving sprayings entirely.

“People have all kinds of different reasons. It could be a concern over environmental or health concerns,” Lawson said. “The science tells us that there is a very, very low risk to adults and children from these applications … We don’t particularly recommend [residents opt out], but the law allows them to do it.”

Regardless of the request, the Norfolk office is pushing people to use its website to get in touch with them, either by filing a form to request spraying, or filling out a document to opt out.



E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article