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Ten-year-old cancer patient helps Stop & Shop raise money for Jimmy Fund

Posted by Christina Jedra  May 1, 2013 08:10 AM

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At right, from left: cashier Tony Eason, store manager, Angela Perkins (Michayla's aunt), and Triple Winner Ambassador, Michayla Mathis with a customer.

Photo: Paul Hortitz

Ten-year-old Michayla Mathis has a brain tumor that affects her vision, but that didn’t stop the fifth-grader from visiting her local Super Stop & Shop as a Jimmy Fund Clinic Patient Partner on Saturday to help raise money and awareness for cancer research. 

Mathis, who was diagnosed with optic pathway glioma last year, helped sell tickets at the Everett Super Stop & Shop for the Triple Winner Game, where customers can buy a ticket to win prizes. Tickets cost $1 each. 

“One hundred percent of that dollar goes to the Stop & Shop Family Pediatric Brain Tumor Clinic at Dana-Farber,” said Judi Palmer, director of marketing for the New England division of the chain. 

Palmer said this annual event for the division has raised $50 million for in the past 24 years. 

The game offers three chances to win. When customers scratch the left side of the ticket, they have the chance to win store products. The right side scratch-off offers a possible cash prize up to $10,000. The third chance to win comes when there are leftover or unclaimed prizes, which are then given to sweepstakes winners who submit their name to a drawing.

Michayla lives in Roslindale with her parents, Michael and Michelle, and older brother, Michael, 20.  She was diagnosed with a brain tumor in April 2012, and her treatment currently includes chemotherapy.  She attends fifth grade at Happy Hollow, and recently learned how to sew. She loves fashion and hopes work in the fashion industry when she grows up. She loves dancing and is enrolled in a hip-hop class.  Michayla used to do gymnastics and hopes to start again after her treatment is finished.

“It feels good,” said Mathis, who also fund-raises for Dana-Farber with friends by selling homemade jewelry. “I liked raising money for the cause.” 

Michelle Mathis said that her daughter had positive interactions with customers.

“They were really nice,” she said. “She enjoyed it.” 

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