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Fans help the Boston Red Sox any way they can with their superstitious ways

Posted by Andrew Tran  October 29, 2013 12:52 PM

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High drama doesn’t just come on the baseball diamond as it has in the first five games of this year’s gripping World Series. Fans join in, too, wearing special clothes, which they sometimes decline to wash; sitting in certain seats or trading those seats with buddies at crucial times; crossing their fingers or saying a silent prayer with the bases loaded.

Hey, it’s October baseball, after all.

All five 2013 World Series games between the Boston Red Sox and St. Louis Cardinals have had their memorable moments. Game 4 Sunday night had a different kind of walk-off finish for the Red Sox, this one a first-base pickoff of a Cardinal pinch runner.

Game 5 on Monday night was the fourth game in a row decided by two runs or less as Jon Lester outlasted Cardinals ace Adam Wainwright.

With Boston now leading the seven-game series, 3-2, Red Sox fans – now nine years removed from the 2004 conclusion of the historic 86-year World Series “curse” – can’t be blamed for a bit of eccentricity as they root for a final Series victory.

See how other Red Sox fans cope with their superstitions.

Players rely on ritual (and a bit of superstition) all the time, from past Red Sox great Nomar Garciaparra’s meticulous batters’ box routine to David Ortiz’s explosive handclap before stepping into the batters’ box.

So it’s only natural that fans like Diane Ricard thrive on routine, too – when they watch the World Series on TV, that is.

Whenever the bases are loaded, “I’ll cross my fingers and yell at the (television),” said the 50-year-old Ricard, who planned to watch Game 5 in her Allston living room.

Paul Sully, 61, of the North End has been wearing the same lucky red plaid pajamas during World Series games for decades now.

“And you can’t wash them either,” Sully said. “That will ruin it.”

Bleary eyes, cramped fingers and smelly pajamas. Small sacrifices for the fans as they prepare for another night of rooting.

This article is being published under an arrangement between the Boston Globe and Emerson College.

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