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Raw milk dairies in Foxborough and elsewhere at center of regulation debate

Posted by Your Town  December 5, 2013 11:35 AM

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An agricultural group is sticking up for state regulation of raw milk dairies, as the town of Foxborough weighs local oversight.

"Massachusetts sets tough standards for its dairy farmers and every day our farmers rise to meet those challenges and produce the best raw milk available anywhere,” said Winton Pitcoff, coordinator of the Northeast Organic Farming Association/Mass Raw Milk Network, in a statement.

Unpasteurized milk has a following around the country as gastrophiles seek out the unadulterated flavors of the beverage, according to news stories over recent years. There is also a patchwork of regulation in different states, with 33 states allowing raw milk sales, and opposition to its sale by the Food and Drug Administration.

“Milk and milk products provide a wealth of nutrition benefits. But raw milk can harbor dangerous microorganisms that can pose serious health risks to you and your family,” the FDA said on a webpage. The FDA said between 1993 and 2006, 1,500 people in the country were sickened from raw milk or cheese and raw milk is 150 times more likely to cause illness than pasteurized dairy products.

State regulations allow dairies to sell raw milk as long as it is cooled soon after it is milked, it has low levels of bacteria, the milk bottle is dated and permitted for sale for five days after bottling, and it contains a warning label. According to NOFA, the Department of Agricultural Resources has a “stellar” record of ensuring product safety, with no illnesses attributable to raw milk in two decades under the current regulatory structure.

“The state regulations attempt to ensure that the production of milk is done using healthy animals, that the activity is conducted in such a way as to prevent the introduction of contaminants, that the product is handled appropriately to inhibit spoilage in an effort to mitigate the risk of any consumer being exposed to harmful pathogens,” state Energy and Environmental Affairs spokeswoman Krista Selmi told the News Service, saying 28 farms sell raw milk retail. According to the Boston Globe, Lawton’s Family Farm’s owner has said the proposed raw milk rules in Foxborough could put the farm out of business.

- A. Metzger/SHNS

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