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Boston Renaissance Charter School celebrates second annual Champions for Children Gala

Posted by Jeremy C. Fox  April 2, 2013 03:37 PM

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Boston Renaissance honors April 2013.jpg

Boston Renaissance Charter Public School

Faculty, honorees, and guests at the Champions for Children Gala. Front row: Monroe “Bud” Moseley, vice president and director at Isaacson, Miller Inc.; honorees Carol Fulp, Marta Rosa, and J. Keith Motley; faculty members Evelyn Lee and Alison Spade; Paula Wright; Donny Wright; and honoree Joan Wallace-Benjamin. Back row: Lennitt Bligen Jr., vice chair of the school’s board of trustees; school Superintendent Roger F. Harris; and Robert Lewis Jr.

The Boston Renaissance Charter Public School recognized local leaders in business, education, and social services for their contributions to Boston children at the second annual Champions for Children Gala, the school announced.

Robert Lewis Jr., former vice president of program for the Boston Foundation, hosted the gala, which drew about 140 guests, the school said in a statement.

Honorees at the March 14 event at the school’s Hyde Park campus included Carol Fulp, vice president and CEO of The Partnership Inc., a non-profit career development organization for professionals of color; Jackie Jenkins-Scott, president of Wheelock College; J. Keith Motley, chancellor of UMass Boston; and Joan Wallace-Benjamin, president and CEO of the Home for Little Wanderers.

The school also recognized faculty members Evelyn Lee, director of visual and performing arts, and Alison Spade, a third grade teacher and 2013 Massachusetts Teacher of the Year nominee.

Students, including the school’s choir, the Voices of Renaissance, performed musical selections, with fourth-grade student Jadynn Miller playing Beethoven’s “Fur Elise” and fellow fourth-grader Joab Johnson performing John Legend’s “Ordinary People.”

The school, which serves more than 1,000 mostly African-American and Latino students from 10 Boston neighborhoods, was placed on probation on Feb. 25 by the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education because of declining academic achievement.

Roger F. Harris, the school’s superintendent and chief executive officer, told the board that he and his staff recognize the need for improvement but that the school offers many special programs and resources for its students, most of whom come from low-income families.

Jeremy C. Fox can be reached at jeremy.fox@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter: @jeremycfox.
Follow Hyde Park on Twitter: @YourHydePark.

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