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State launches study on Casey Overpass replacement ideas

Posted by Matt Rocheleau  March 16, 2011 10:35 AM

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caseyoverpass1.jpg

(Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff file)

Photo from January: The 57-year-old Casey Overpass — once praised as as a marvel of the modern age — is literally beyond repair, and transportation officials intend to tear it down. The jarring roadway always seems to be under construction.

The state transportation department is launching a six-month study about what should replace the aged-beyond-repair Monsignor William J. Casey Overpass.

The study will include ideas for both above-ground as well as ground-level solutions to replace the 57-year-old Arborway, or Route 203, highway bridge that passes over Forest Hills, the state said.

Officials say they hope to complete whatever project will replace the Casey Overpass by June 2016. The state told the Globe earlier this year, it intends to dismantle the existing overpass and begin a replacement project by mid-2013.

The “planning study phase will consist of an extensive public outreach process” an announcement from the state Department of Transportation said. Design and construction phases will follow the study’s completion.

As part of the study, the transportation department has formed a Casey Overpass Working Advisory Group, which “will study and evaluate safe, accessible, multi-modal landscape, streetscape and transportation options that will lead to a project,” the announcement said.

Public information meetings will be held in sequence with advisory group meetings, officials said.

An informational meeting will be held early next month to present the study’s goals and outline the public participation process. After a presentation, comments and questions will be fielded.

The April 6 meeting at the Agassiz School Community Center, 20 Child St., will run from 6:30-8:30 p.m., and follows an open house that begins at 6 p.m.

The study will be funded by the state’s $3-billion, eight-year Accelerated Bridge Program, which was created in spring 2008 to work toward repairing or replacing 543 structurally-deficient Massachusetts bridges representing about 11 percent of the total number of bridges statewide. Through the end of last year, the number structurally-deficient bridges had been reduced to 475.

For more information about the project contact Paul King, MassDOT Project Manager, 617-973-8137 or Paul.C.King@state.ma.us. To be added to the project distribution list, contact John Romano, 617-973-7028 or John.Romano@state.ma.us.

E-mail Matt Rocheleau at mjrochele@gmail.com.

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