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MusicMDs now in Massachusetts

March 3, 2014 10:41 AM
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The following was submitted by MusicMDs:

MusicMDs is a music-therapy-inspired, independent volunteer organization of high-school/college musicians. MusicMDs use their music to promote patient healing and recovery in healthcare institutions. They actively assist in the healing process by offering live, one-on-one musical performances to hospitalized patients.
 
MusicMDs add a new dimension to patient interaction by removing traditional barriers of language, education level, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status and incorporating live music in patient communication. Performers’ music-facilitated dialogue improves mood and outlook of patients who are isolated from their communities when admitted into a clinical environment of a hospital. 
  
Founded in Central Florida in 2009, MusicMDs currently serves four hospitals nationwide. Through this program, 23 students have amassed 1250+ hours serving over 7,500 patients at every stage of the disease and recovery spectrum. 

MusicMDs’s first New England branch was started at Lawrence General Hospital in Lawrence, Massachusetts by Esha Bansal in December 2012. In the LGH-MusicMDs partnership, six accomplished Phillips Academy Andover musicians currently serenade LGH patients, performing throughout the hospital’s units like surgery, pediatrics, dialysis, and intensive cardiac care. 

MusicMDs is a one-of-a-kind, student-run volunteer program which has effectively introduced music to interdisciplinary patient care. Please visit www.musicmds.org


"You have no idea what you just did for me. I still can't believe my eyes… I saw an angel come in to play me some music." – Lawrence General Hospital(LGH) Patient, 2/23/13

"This music is the relaxing tool I need for [my patient] to calm down and accept the IV." – LGH Pediatric Nurse, 12/14/13

“It’s obvious: you cure people with your music.” – LGH Family Member, 12/7/13

Young cat rescued by MSPCA has a new home

February 18, 2014 01:29 PM

Marte, the young cat found tied to a radiator by a shoestring when a Lawrence animal control officer seized him Jan. 24, has been adopted.

Marte at Home.jpgErin Backkom of Portsmouth, N.H., who has been fostering the 7-month-old cat since his recovery from surgery at the MSPCA’s Angell Animal Medical Center, has decided to make him a permanent member of her household.

Marte underwent extensive surgery at the Angell center in Boston two days after being removed from the home. His owner, whose identity is not being released, is facing felony animal cruelty charges for failing to provide necessary veterinary care.

Preliminary exams at the MSPCA-Nevins Farm in Methuen - where the cat was taken after being removed from the Lawrence home - showed he had swallowed a string weeks earlier, which had caused severe internal injury, according to MSPCA spokesman Rob Halpin. He was immediately transferred to Angell.

During the surgery, doctors removed nearly half of Marte's intestines because they were so damaged by the string that he had swallowed.

Surgeon Andrew Goodman also had to re-route his gall bladder so that excess bile could continue to drain properly from his body.

After recovering at Angell for a day, Marte was moved back to MSPCA-Nevins Farm, and soon went into foster care with Backkom.

"We are thrilled that he is in a forever home, one that he so deserves," said Halpin.

MSPCA rescues sick cat tied to radiator in Lawrence

February 4, 2014 11:07 AM

The following was submitted by the MSPCA:

A 7-month-old cat named “Marte” is on the mend after he was found tied by his neck to the radiator of a Lawrence home.

cat1.jpgThe cat, removed from the home on Jan. 24 by the city’s animal control officer and taken to the MSPCA-Nevins Farm in nearby Methuen, had swallowed a string weeks earlier, which had caused severe internal injury.

Marte underwent extensive surgery at the MSPCA’s Angell Animal Medical Center in Boston two days after being removed from the home. His owner, whose identity is not being released, is facing felony animal cruelty charges for failing to provide necessary veterinary care.

By the time Marte was found he had been vomiting and was extremely dehydrated, thin and weak. Worse, the string he swallowed had lodged under his tongue and stretched all the way down his throat, wrapping around and damaging his intestines.

At Nevins Farm, director Mike Keiley evaluated young Marte and was shocked by what he saw. “This cat had clearly gone weeks with this string lodged in his body, creating untold damage to his insides,” he said. “The fact that he was tied by his neck only added to his misery.”

Keiley immediately transferred Marte to Angell where surgeon Andrew Goodman evaluated him. Marte was already septic — a condition marked by extreme internal infection — because the string had punctured his intestines in multiple areas. Dr. Goodman concluded that while surgery to remove the string and repair his intestines carried only a 30 percent chance of survival, Marte would certainly die without it.

Dr. Goodman had to remove nearly half of Marte’s intestines and re-route his gall bladder so that excess bile could continue to drain properly from his body. After recovering at Angell for a day, Marte was moved back to MSPCA-Nevins Farm where he remains in foster care.

“He’s definitely not out of the woods yet and we won’t know for at least a couple weeks whether he may need additional surgery,” said Keiley. “But we’re confident that he’s going to make it - so much so that we’re looking for potential adopters to step forward. We want to give him a home in which he’ll know only safety, warmth, and comfort for the rest of his life.”

The MSPCA-Angell’s three statewide animal care and adoption centers take in, and place into new homes, thousands of homeless dogs, cats, and other animals every year. Marte represents just one of the many animals who arrive every day, and whose futures are brighter as a result of the care they receive. Readers can contribute directly toward the care of these animals by clicking here.


About the MSPCA

The MSPCA-Angell is a national and international leader in animal protection and veterinary medicine and provides direct hands-on care for thousands of animals each year. Founded in 1868, it is the second-oldest humane society in the United States. Services include animal protection and adoption, advocacy, humane education, law enforcement, and world-class veterinary care. The MSPCA-Angell is a private, nonprofit organization. It does not receive any government funding nor is it funded or operated by any national humane organization. The MSPCA-Angell relies solely on the support and contributions from individuals who care about animals. Please visit www.mspca.org and like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/mspcaangell.

MSPCA rescues 65 birds from Lawrence home

January 24, 2014 05:50 PM

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MSPCA-Angell photos

65 birds were crammed together in dirty cages in the Lawrence home.

The following was submitted by the MSPCA:

Sixty five birds - including a variety of parrots, doves, and finches - were removed Friday from a dirty and overcrowded home in Lawrence and taken to the MSPCA-Nevins Farm in Methuen, the organization has announced. The birds, crammed together in a small room that lacked proper heat and ventilation, were surrendered along with three young kittens.

The birds will live at the MSPCA-Nevins Farm until permanent homes can be found. The new arrivals have strained an already overloaded bird room at the facility's Noble Family Animal Care and Adoption Center, which is now housing close to 90 birds ranging from macaws, cockatiels, parrots, parakeets, and more.

The MSPCA came to the birds' aid after the Lawrence animal control officer received complaints about the birds being kept in unsanitary conditions in the home's enclosed porch. The owner of the birds, whose identity is not being released, agreed to turn the animals over to the MSPCA when it was clear that the living conditions posed a significant threat to their health. Nevins Farm Director Mike Keiley has made the birds' safety and comfort the top priority.

"Not only have these birds endured a level of overcrowding typically seen in hoarding conditions, but their socialization and overall health needs have gone unmet for years," he said. "Many of them are fragile and scared ... and you can imagine how bad the conditions were when for their own well-being we opted to take them from the home on a day when the temperature was hovering around 10 degrees."

For the most part the birds are healthy, despite being hungry and cold. Keiley expects all of animals, including the kittens, to recover and be placed into permanent homes.

The MSPCA-Nevins Farm is no stranger to large-scale animal surrenders. In November 2013, 33 guinea pigs were surrendered after living in an overcrowded home in New Hampshire. And 71 birds were taken in on a single day in February 2012.

Keiley stressed the need for both prospective adopters and donors to step forward and help create a brighter future for the birds. "Monetary donations are very important in these times because of the now greatly expanded number of animals who need our care," he said.

Anyone interested in adopting one or some of the animals is encouraged to visit the MSPCA-Nevins Farm Animal Care and Adoption Center at 400 Broadway, Methuen or visit mspca.org. Those who wish to donate to the MSPCA-Nevins Farm can do so by clicking here.

The MSPCA-Angell is a national and international leader in animal protection and veterinary medicine and provides direct hands-on care for thousands of animals each year. Founded in 1868, it is the second-oldest humane society in the United States. Services include animal protection and adoption, advocacy, humane education, law enforcement, and world-class veterinary care. The MSPCA-Angell is a private, nonprofit organization. It does not receive any government funding nor is it funded or operated by any national humane organization. The MSPCA-Angell relies solely on the support and contributions of individuals who care about animals. Please visit mspca.org.

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Cockatiels make themselves at home at the MSPCA at Nevins Farm.

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