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"Eelgrass in Salem Sound," second lecture in Abbot Library series

Posted by Christina Jedra  February 15, 2013 10:00 AM

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The following was submitted by the Abbot Public Library:

What are those dark, mysterious patches of water that we swim and sail over?  On Wednesday, February 27, at 7:00 pm, Marine Fisheries Biologist Tay Evans will take us underwater for a glimpse of the seagrass meadows of Salem Sound and talk with us about why this habitat is so important for fisheries, water quality and protecting our coastlines from storms.  At this session, you will also learn about what you can do to help protect eelgrass and hear about ongoing restoration and monitoring projects, including Tay’s work on conservation moorings, designed to minimize boating impacts to the seafloor.

Tay Evans has been studying the ecology of eelgrass in Salem Sound, for the past seven years, and has been working to map, monitor and restore this valuable habitat. Tay is chair of the MA Interagency Seagrass Group, which brings together researchers and scientists working on seagrass projects in Massachusetts, and she serves on the Salem Sound Coastwatch Board of Directors. She received her M.S. in Natural Resources: Water Resources, from the University of New Hampshire, where she worked with the international seagrass expert, Dr. Fred Short, and the SeagrassNet Global Monitoring program.

“Eelgrass in Salem Sound” is the second talk in the new lecture series, “Underwater in Salem Sound,” sponsored by Salem Sound Coastwatch and the Abbot Public Library. Two more lectures will be presented in 2013, followed by another four in 2014 at the Abbot Public Library. The 2013 lectures are being held on the last Wednesday of the month (the upcoming dates are March 27 and April 24) from 7:00 - 8:30 pm. The sessions are free and open to the public. 

This Lecture Series is funded in part by a grant from the Massachusetts Environmental Trust (MET). MET is funded through the sale of environmental license plates. Every Massachusetts driver who purchases one of the “Preserve the Trust” license plates is contributing to the Trust and to the State’s environmental well-being. 

The Lecture Series is part of a MET grant awarded to Salem Sound Coastwatch, a local nonprofit watershed protection organization, to study the issue of turbidity in Salem Harbor over the next two and a half years. Turbidity, which is cloudiness in the water column, affects the ability of the water to sustain marine life. Dr. Brad Hubeny of Salem State University’s Geological Science Department is the principal investigator along with Barbara Warren, Salem Sound Coastwatch Executive Director.

The Abbot Public Library is located at 235 Pleasant Street, Marblehead, MA 01945. For additional information, please call 781-631-1481. 

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