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The Vespers and Hayley Reardon will play at the me&thee

Posted by Christina Jedra  March 28, 2013 10:20 AM

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The following was submitted by The Me & Thee:

On Friday, April 19, the  me&thee hosts a show featuring some very talented people al under the age of 23.  The Vespers, uniquely made up of two sibling duos; the Cryar sisters, and the Jones brothers, have just released their second album The Fourth Wall. It’s hard to fathom a better collection of unsigned, indie artists in the 19-22 age bracket capable of breaking through that wall. Hayley Reardon, a Marblehead High sophomore, is already a me & thee favorite. Doors open at 7:30 PM for this 8:00 PM show at the me&thee coffeehouse which is located at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Marblehead at 28 Mugford Street.
 
The Vespers are one of those lucky young bands who are becoming a word of mouth sensation though they’ve only quietly self-released one record (with a second due out in April). With two sisters on lead vocals and two brothers filling out the sound, the foursome is distinguished by an arsenal of instruments and the kind of harmony only siblings can create. They have toured from Boston to Austin, hitting everything from festivals to college campuses in between. The lead vocalists Callie (21) and Phoebe Cryar (19) were brought up in a musical family in Nashville, honing their gifts as young kids singing background vocals on Music Row. While their pure harmonies are described as “ghostly and haunting” and “honey sweet,” they both have expansive characteristics to their vocal and instrumental abilities. It was a chance meeting at a campfire jam that brought the sisters an earthy grounding in brothers Bruno (20) and Taylor Jones (22), who were drawn to gritty southern rock and the depth of their father’s record collection that included soul music from the likes of Stevie Wonder. Everyone in the band contributes to the songwriting, but the most prolific writer is Phoebe. “We all grew up listening to a little bit of everything, but roots music didn’t come in until more recently,” says Bruno. “Folk and roots music tend to draw from spiritual themes. “Most of our songs come about really organically like that, without planning to write. It just happens and we try to let it flow,” says Bruno. “Got No Friends” is a tip of the hat to the bluegrass genre. “We cut the first half live around one microphone, which was a first for us,” says Taylor. “That song was written right after the Nashville flood, and right as I learned to play mandolin after our family business flooded. Our world was really shook up after that May (2010). The flood eventually inspired us to quit our other day jobs, school, and pursue music full time, on a leap of faith.” Most of the songs have the energy of a live show because the band polished them on the road, where they also came up with the album title. The fourth wall, in theatre terms, is the invisible wall between the audience and performers. “Our music reflects that. We decided to go on tour shortly after we joined forces and we really learned what our band was all about while playing to the people at our early shows. It shaped us and that’s how we really became ‘The Vespers.’ It’s all about connecting with people and breaking down that invisible wall,” Says Callie.
 
In addition to sharing the stage with folk icons such as Peter Yarrow and Tom Rush, and recently releasing her debut album Where the Artists Go, Hayley Reardon has spent the past few years inspiring her peers to express themselves and create positive change through her role as Peer Spokesperson for PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center.

Recently naming her a 2012 “Bostonian Of The Year”, The Boston Globe characterized her as…”a confident, radiant teenage singer/songwriter who is helping to pen the next chapter of the Boston folk scene…while Reardon is rapidly making a name for herself under the stage lights, it could be said that she’s having a bigger impact on her peers across the country as a leading spokesperson for bullying prevention.  By pairing her music with a message of collective responsibility, she has become an effective teen-to-teen ambassador, sought after by schools nationwide.”
 
Tickets for the performance by The Vespers with Hayley Reardon opening are $16 in advance and $19 at the door.  Student and senior discounts available. Tickets are available online at www.meanthee.org and can be purchased in person in Marblehead at either the Spirit of ’76 Bookstore or the Arnould Gallery As at all me & thee coffeehouse events, refreshments are available, including homemade pastries, coffee, and teas.  The me & thee has a handicapped-accessible entrance and an accessible bathroom, is a smoke-free environment, and is easily reached by MBTA bus.  The me & thee is the oldest continually running acoustic coffeehouse in New England, and probably the country.   The me & thee has been and will always be a volunteer, non-profit organization sponsored by the Unitarian Universalist Church of Marblehead.  For information and directions, call 781-631-8987 or check the website www.meandthee.org.

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