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Revision Urban Farm receives financial boost from Walmart foundation

Posted by Patrick Rosso  June 28, 2012 01:53 PM

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(Patrick D. Rosso/Boston.com/2012)


Jonathan Scott, president and CEO of Victory Programs, joined by Mike Cambria, the manager of Walmart’s Walpole store, and other Walmart employees.


Victory Program’s Dorchester-based Revision Urban Farm received a financial boost Thursday from the Walmart Foundation's State Giving Program, which presented the group with a $25,000 grant to help off-set operational costs.

The money will be used to run the Fabyan Street farm that provides food for area residents and the adjacent housing that provides 22 formerly homeless families with a roof over their heads.

“We made a deliberate commitment to not open up a stand in Copley or downtown Boston because there is already a lot in those neighborhoods and we wanted to be here and help this neighborhood,” said Jonathan Scott, president and CEO of Victory Programs. “It started out as surviving and now it’s about thriving.”

Walmart has expressed interest in building a store in the city of Boston, though city officials have been cool to the idea.

The farm, which started as an urban garden next to the housing in the 1990s, has since blossomed into fully functional urban farm, providing locals with access to healthy vegetables, allowing them to take the lead in their health.

Last year, according to Victory Programs, the farm distributed over a 100,000 servings of vegetables to residents through the farm and its stand on Blue Hill Avenue.

“It’s about accessibility. I don’t have anywhere around here where I can buy quality vegetables,” said Jeannette Sisco, an area resident and shareholder in the farm. “It may be miles to the nearest Whole Foods, but we have a mini Whole Foods right here.”

Thursday’s grant, which Victory Programs applied for, was a major boost to the group, but also came with a little extra man power as members of local Walmart stores rolled up their sleeves and helped out at the farm that afternoon.

“Helping out allows us to do more than just go to a job,” said Mike Cambria, the manager of Walmart’s Walpole store.

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Email Patrick D. Rosso, patrick.d.rosso@gmail.com. Follow him @PDRosso, or friend him on Facebook.


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