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Milton selectmen discuss 40B plan for Brush Hill Road

Posted by Dave Eisenstadter  March 8, 2013 02:01 PM

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Traffic was identified as the biggest concern about a new development that may come to town under the state’s 40B affordable-housing law.

Having received a petition with 300 signatures opposing development on Brush Hill Road, Milton selectmen discussed what that development might look like Thursday.

Developer Mews Venture has applied to build a 270-unit development at 1259 Brush Hill Rd., located near Fuller Village. Fuller Village residents signed a petition presented to selectmen on Feb. 28, stating that the development was likely to exacerbate traffic issues.

But because of the state’s 40B law, Milton selectmen and other town officials may not be able to do much to prevent the development from coming in, according to selectmen Chairman Tom Hurley.

“Twenty five percent [of the housing units] would be affordable and the other 75 percent would be market rate,” Hurley said. “It would be 270 units in three small villages, kind of demarked by wetland areas.”

Planning Director William Clark said the plan involved several townhouse buildings as well as a set of larger buildings that would be four- and five-stories high, he said.

Five houses will be able to see directly into the site, Clark added.

Betsy Buchbinder, a resident of Fuller Village who submitted the petition to selectmen, said traffic and environmental concerns were foremost on her mind.

“The potential increase of vehicles is daunting,” Buchbinder said on Feb. 28.

Selectman Robert Sweeney commented Thursday that Fuller Village was the largest taxpayer in town and that its voice should be heeded.

Clark said that the proposed development might wind up being an even larger taxpayer.

Selectman Denis Keohane said traffic takes about 20 minutes to move from Curry College to I-95 taking Route 138, a distance of only about 2.5 miles.

Hurley said his understanding of the situation was that the developer did not have to improve the traffic situation, but that traffic could become no worse.

“They would have to do some mitigation,” Hurley said.

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